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Full text of "Elchanite (Brooklyn, New York, N.Y.), 1958"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/elchanitebrookly1958unse 



to 



u 



xplore the intricacies of the universe. 






[958 



LCHANITE 



PUBLISHED BY THE ST LT DEISTS OF 
YESniVA UNIVERSITY HIGH STHOOL 

Brooklyn 

2270 rhureh Avenue. Brooklvn 26, New York 



Look out into the heavens . . . 

Genesis 15 




contents 




3 


INTRODUCTION 


4 


SCHOOL 


5 


ADMINISTRATION 


6 


STAFF 


8 


TALMUD FACULTY 


10 


HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY 


17 


SENIORS 


38 


Honors 


39 


Diary 


43 


ACTIVITIES 


44 


CO. 


47 


Student Court 


48 


Service Squad 


50 


Topics 


51 


Bulletin 


52 


Variety Nite 


54 


Arista 


56 


Debating 


58 


Library 


60 


Y.O.C. 


61 


Kolenu 


62 


Varsity 


64 


Budding Sports 


66 


J.V. 


67 


Intramurals 


68 


Co-op 


69 


LITERATURE 


70 


Poetry — By S. Sussman and B. Rosen 


71 


How Great Is Our Debt- By B. Weinstock 


72 


One Summer On A Farm — By B. Sussman 


73 


Poetry - By P. Stein 


74 


The Eye - By I. Haas 


75 


Devoid Of Reason - By P. Stein . 


76 


He Lived By The Book - By P. Stein 


77 


Without Hope - By W. Reich 


78 


The A nswer — By H. Tanowitz 


80 


A Fond Farewell — By J. Grossman 


81 


ADVERTISEMENTS 


11 


SENIOR DIRECTORY 




E 



to 




iterate man from his earthly limitations. 



C 
H 
A 
N 
I 

T 
E 




The infinite speck, unknown, obscure yet existing, 

The discovery, the revelation, the work of man, . 
the handiwork of G-d. 

The horizon once the limitation of men's minds, now 
the challenge. 

Beyond it lies hope, answers, further questions . . . 
and G-d. 

P. Stein 





the $ C H G L 





ADMINISTRATION 



Dr. Samuel Belkin, President 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 




Dr. Shelley R. Saphire, Supervisor, 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOLS 




Rabbi Abraham N. Zuroff, Principal, and 
Mr. Samuel Levine, Director 



to 




reate a showcase for man's 
finest achievements. 




Left to right: M. Mednick. A. Berman, D. Gold, M. Strahl 
berg. Business Managers 




Left to right: P. Frost, S. Stein, H, Belman, L. Padwa. Activities Editors, B. 
Pallant, S. Goldman, Associates 




Left to right: H. Adelman, A. Wolfish, Mr. H. Allan, Faculty Adviser, W. 
Enker, Art Editor, B. Weinstock, Editor-in-Chief 



Ff 



N 



S. 



N 



\ 



\ 



N 



\. 



\ 




\ 



Left to right: M. Strobel, J. Grossman, Co-Editors, Mr. H. 
Allan, Faculty Adviser, B. Weinstock, Editor-in-Chief 





A. Rosenberg, P. Stein, Literary Editors 



J. Schnure, Typing Editor 




faculty 



talmud 



Rabbi Solomon Drillman 






'^*^' 






ig^^^lP^^ 



Rabbi Wolf Durchin 




Rabbi Josepli Epstein 




Rabbi Peretz Yogel, Talmud Examiner 



OUR Talmud faculty, under whose instruction 
the student spends one half of his school 
time, is composed of twelve sincere and dedicated 
rabbis, many of whom are leaders of Orthodox 
Jewry in their respective communities. The major 
portion of our morning program is devoted to 
the study of Talmud, but Bible, Prophets and 
Jewish Law are also taught. The entire curricu- 
lum is such as to give each student a well- 
rounded Jewish education. 

In the Talmud department, students are 
grouped according to proficiency rather than 
years to enable each student to learn at his own 
pace. Promotion is based solely on the student's 
knowledge of Talmud and is independent of his 
high school standing. Periodic examinations by 
Rabbi Peretz Yogel, Talmud examiner, assure 
correct placement. 





Rabbi Samuel Faivushevitz 



Rabbi Herman Frankel 





Rabbi Meyer Karlin 



•» Rabbi Zelo Schussheim 



DiS ^'D 



The Talmud class of Rabbi P. Yogel in session. 





Rabbi Pincus Siiebshaievitz 



Rabbi Samuel Shmidman 




Mr. Joseph B. Strum 



THE English department occupies a prominent 
place in our program of studies, each student 
being required to take four years of English. 
Through the joint efforts of the entire staff, the 
curriculum has been kept at a very high standard, 
incorporating instruction in grammar, usage, com- 
position, and American and English Hterature into 
an integrated four year course. 

In recent years the department has taken on 
the added responsibihtty of preparing our students 
for the College Board and Regents Scholarship 
examinations. It is undoubtedly because of their 
guidance that our students have achieved such 
consistently good results in these tests. 




Mr. Josef Brand 





Dr. Max Horwitz* Deceased 



Mr. Sidney Gold 



engfisfi 




Mr. Simon Lippner 



10 



languages 






Mr. Isaac J. Cantor 



Dr. Jechiel Lichtensteiii 




Mr. Jacob Soshuk 



ANOTHER part of the prescribed course of 
^ study is foreign languages. Courses are offered 
in Hebrew, French and Spanish, and each student 
must take four years of Hebrew and two years of 
either French or Spanish for graduation. Instruc- 
tion in languages is constantly being improved 
and language courses are becoming increasingly 
popular. 





Mr. Alvin Kamber 



Mr. Francis Callan 




Mr. Milton Spin 



IT is gratifying to note that with the increased 
nationwide emphasis on instruction in science 
and mathematics, Y.U.H.S.B. not only offers four 
years of both science and mathematics, but also 
has a fairly high percentage of students who take 
full advantage of these courses. 

Two and a half years of mathematics are re- 
quired for all students, but many students take the 
full four year course. Our mathematics depart- 
ment, consisting of teachers drawn from several 
fine schools, is no doubt responsible for this large 
registration for elective mathematics courses. By 
their interesting and varied techniques they have 
managed to instill a great interest in their subject 
in a large majority of the student body. 




Mr. Louis Cooper 




mathematics 




Mr. Harry Goldstein 





Mr. Henry Mayer 






■ ■ ■ ■ ■■■■■^■■*|S!!»2= 
Rill ^SIKIIIF^IIIIIIB 



Mr. Morris Septimus 



12 





Mr George Davidson 



OUR science department offers four years of 
science. General science and biology, taught 
by Mr Davidson and Mr. Schiff respectively, 
must be taken by all students. Chemistry and 
physics, taught by Mr. Lebowitz, are available 
ds electives. 

Laboratory work forms in integral part of all 
couises Although laboratory facilities are limited, 
constant acquisition of new materials is continu- 
ally making these facilities more effective as 
teachmg aids. 



<■ 






:-y>'>->: 



Mr. David Schiff 



■•<•"■"■ •:<■:■: .■>.-. 





Mr. Samuel Lebowitz 




Mr. Martin Lilker's American History class. 



soc\a\ studies 




Mr. Morris Purcell 




1^ ^^ y 




Mr. Robert E. Bassell 



INSTRUCTION in thie social studies round out the basic 
curriculum. Each student takes three and a half years 
of social studies including citizenship education, world geogra- 
phy, American and world history and economics. 

The social studies department is one of the smallest depart- 
ments in the school. However, the interesting and effective 
teaching methods which the members of the department use 
in their classes are reflected in both the popularity of social 
studies courses and the consistently good grades which our 
students achieve on the history regents examinations. 



14 




ART All students are required to take two years 
each of art, music and physical education, the minor sub- 
jects in our curriculum. Fundamentals of design and color 
and the history of the subject are stressed in art, while 
in music, an appreciation of classical pieces and a knowl- 
edge of basic terms are acquired. Physical education pro- 
vides instruction in basic sports and enables each student 
to receive the exercise necessary to physical fitness. 

Mr. Harry Allan 




Mr. Martin Lilker 



music 




Mr. Leon Leibowitz 



GUIDANCE Since its inception three 

years ago, the Guidance Department, under the capable 
direction of Mr. Martin Lilker, has aided many students 
in the solution of their academic and personal problems. 
The Guidance Department plays an important role in the 
orientation of freshmen and sophomores, and has per- 
formed the particular function of helping juniors and 
seniors in their choice of college and vocation. In the 
coming years, the Guidance Department will undoubtedly 
continue to expand and become an increasingly more im- 
portant function of our school. 




physical education 



Mr. Harry Morse 



N 




^ 



15 



office staff 





Left to light: Mrs. Gertrude Sater, Secretary, 
Samuel Shiff, Student Assistant, Mr. Jacob Blazer, 
Office Manager 




Mrs. Yetta Rosenman, Secretary 

MRS. Yetta Rosenman, Secretary 
to the Principal, has endeared 
herself to all because of the active in- 
terest she takes in the students. Al- 
though her official duties keep her con- 
stantly busy, she is always available for 
advice on personal problems. The ex- 
ecutive office is ably run by Mr. Jacob 
Blazer, Office Manager, assisted by 
Mrs. Gertrude Sader, Secretary, and 
Samuel ShifT, student assistant. 



maintenance 




MR. John Santiago, Chief Custodian, is responsible for 
maintaining the physical appearance and cleanliness of 
the building. "John", as he is known throughout the school also 
runs a food concession for the convenience of the students. 
Through his service to the school and his friendly manner he 
has become popular with both students and faculty alike. 



Mr. John Santiago, Chief Custodian 




16 



E 
L 
C 




ew creation from man's capacity 



A 

N 
I 

T 
E 




SENIORS 







ROBERT APSEL 

Class Athletic Manager 4; Chess Team 7, 8; 
Service Squad 7; Sanitation Manager 7. 

Bob, a fine pawn-pusher, proved w us that 
"where there's a will there's a way." Coming 
from a public elementary school. Bob worked 
hard at Y.U.H.S.B., and by his senior year 
was in Rabbi Karlin's class. He will study math 
at Brooklyn. 

"By a mighty effort of will," 
Bentley 



HENRY BELMAN 

CO. President 8; Vice-President 7; Class Vice- 
President 2-4; Athletic Manager 1, 5; Arista 
6-8; Topics Staff 6; Varsity Debating Team 
5-8; Varsity Track Team 5-7; Class Debating 
Team 1-8; Variety Nite 1-8. 

Hank, our crooning commuter, had a fine 
voice with which he entertained us at Variety 
Nite. His flair for politics led him to become 
both President and Vice-President of the 
school. He will put both these interests aside, 
however, to major in engineering at Polytech. 

"All's fair in love and war." 
The Fish 



ARTHUR BERMAN 

Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8; Topics As- 
sistant Business Manager 5, 6; Business Staff 
2-8; Photography Staff 5, 6; Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 1; Class Debating Team 5; Chemis- 
try Lab Assistant 7, 8; English Library Staff 
5,6. 

Arthur first acquired fame by always having 
other commitments on Sundays. Our financier 
and Ambassador to Europe, he carried the flag 
during the Senior Secession. After collecting 
money for the Elchanite, Arthur will continue 
his studies at Yeshiva. 

"Travel is a part of education." 
Bacon 



Our school athletic program. 





V 





Eager stinUnl.'. i luni^iiii: chi 



SOLOMON BOCKSTEIN 

Service Squad 2-8; Variety Nile 4; Hebrew 
Glee Club 4-8; Elchanite Typing Staff 7, 8; 
Atom Typing Staff 7, 8. 

Sol, the Bantamweight champ of the school, 
spent his time counting oblong circles in Julie's 
bio class. Although he would like to cut a 
record, he will stop singing bass to study ac- 
counting at Brooklyn this fall. 

"He sings each song twice over." 
Browning 






PHILIP BRUMER 

Topics Staff 3-6; English Library Staff 3, 4; 
Hebrew Glee Club 3, 4; Elchanite Typing 
Squad 5, 6; Class Debating Team 1-6; Service 
Squad 2, 4, 5, Lieutenant 8. 

Phil, our Brighton representative, spent 
much of his two-year stay in Rabbi YogeVs 
class compiling a list of Rabbi YogeVs favorite 
epithets. A fine learner nevertheless, Phil will 
continue his Talmudic studies at Y.U. in prep- 
aration for the rabbinate. 

"Virtue is its own reward." 
Cicero 



ARI COHEN 

Variety Nite 1-6; Glee Club 1-6; Budget Com- 
mission 7; Service Squad 2, 3, 5, 7. 

After spending 4 years in our school glee 
club, Ari will stop counting chords and will 
start counting numbers as he majors in ac- 
counting. He will continue plugging Philadel- 
phia Brand Cream cheese at Brooklyn in the 
fall. 

"If its Philadelphia its got to be Good." 
Lifted from Bordens 



O'er the water , 



19 





WARREN ENKER 

Elchanite Art Editor 7, 8; Art Squad 1-8; 
Kolenu Art Editor 5-8; Topics Bulletin 1-4; 
Service Squad 1, 2; Office Squad 1. 

Warren devoted his four years ai Y.U.H.S.B. 
mainly to art, Elchanite and Kolenu being the 
chief beneficiaries of his creative abilities. An 
interest in bio, as well, will bring him to the 
study of medicine at Y.U. 

"Art is power." 

Longfellow 



DONALD FRIEDLANDER 

Elchanite Typing Squad 6, 8; Topics Business 
Staff 6; Typing Squad 6; Atom Typing Editor 
5, 6; School Debating Team 7; Class Debating 
Team 6; Variety Nite 3; Service Squad 7; 
English Squad 6; Lost and Found Manager 
7, 8. 

After typing his way through three years at 
Y.U.H.S.B., Don finally "found himself" in 
his senior year, blossoming into our Lost and 
Found manager. He will study mechanical eti- 
gineering at City College. 

"Finders keepers losers weepers." 
Barnetinsky 





PHILIP FROST 

Class President 2; Elchanite Activities Editor 
7, 8; Elchanite Typing Squad 3, 4; Class De- 
bating Manager 4; Class Debating Team 2, 3, 
5, 6; Variety Nite Leader 5, 6; Variety Nite 
1-4; Chagiga Leader 5, 6; Swimming Team 
5, 6; Glee Club 1-4; Service Squad 3, 4; 
Hebrew Library Staff 1, 2; Topics Feature 
Staff 5, 7, 8. 

Phil, the class comedian, captivated us each 
year with his "Getzel" monologues. He was an 
ardent participant in almost every phase of 
our extra-curricular program and could always 
be counted on to do a fine job. He will study 
pre-med at Y.U. come September. 

"Born with a gift of laughter." 
Sabitini 



I 20 




p. Briimc'i- cU'livcis economics report. 






DAVID GOLD 

Class Secretary Treasurer 6; Elchanite Busi- 
ness Staff 7, 8; Topics Business Staff 1; Class 
Athletic Manager 2, 4; Class Debating Team 
2, 5; Junior Varsity Basketball Team 3, 4; 
Captain Varsity Handball team 7, 8; Varsity 
Handball Team 5, 6; Service Squad 5, 6. 

Our official sweater salesman and "yarmul- 
ka" stylist was another of Rabbi Karlin's 
"boys". After four years at Y.U.H.S.B., Dave 
will develop his business prowess by studying 
accounting at N.Y.U. 

"Business! It's quite simple. It's other peo- 
ple's money." 

Dumas 



STEVEN GOLDMAN 

Class President 4, Vice-President 1, Debating 
Manager 3, Debating Team 1-8; Topics Staff 
3, 4, 7, 8; Varsity Debating Team 4-8; Track 
Team 6; Co-op 3, 4, Assistant Manager 5, 
Manager 6-8; Arista 5-8; Ticket Bureau Man- 
ager 6. 

Affectionately known as "Zook", Steve was 
our representative to the "N. Y. Times Youth 
Forum". Besides being co-op manager, he 
found time to operate his own radio station. 
His interest in aviation will lead him to a 
career in aeronautical engineering at Brooklyn 
Polytech. 

"I would rather be right than president." 
Clay 



HENRY GOODMAN 

Arista 5-8; Topics Feature Staff 5; Topics Bul- 
letin Editor-in-chief 7, 8; Associate Editor 5, 
6; Reporter and Typist 3, 4; Atom 6; Kolenu 
5, 6; Chess Team 5; Hebrew Library 2; English 
Library 3, 4; Chief Librarian 5-8; Service Squad 
Captain 8, Lieutenant 7. 

Henry, who was mild-mannered socially, was 
nevertheless the editor of the hard-hitting Top- 
ics Bulletin. He further developed his journal- 
istic ability by participating actively on the 
staffs of the other school publications. He will 
study math at Polytech. 

"Silence is deep as eternity, 

Speech is shallow as time." 
Carlyle 



21 




JOEL GROSSMAN 

Arista 5-8, Leader 8: Kolenu Editor 5-8; Co- 
Editor Elchanite 7, 8; Topics News Staff 5-8; 
School Chess Team 7, 8, Lieutenant Service 
Squad 7, 8; Chief Hebrew Librarian 4-8; School 
Debating Team 5, 6; Class Debating Manager 
1, 3, 4; Editor of Sifrivon 3-6; Atom 5, 6. 

A fondness for Hebrew led Joel to become 
Kolenu editor and chief Hebrew librarian. 
His position as Arista leader shows his versa- 
tility in secidar studies as well. He will seek 
further knowledge at Yeshiva University, 

"I agree with no man's opinions. I have some 
of my own." 

Turgeniev 





IRWIN HAAS 

Topics' Bulletin Reporter 4-8; Topics Typing 
Squad 5-7, Photography Squad 5; Atom Asso- 
ciate Editor 6-8; Elchanite Typing, Squad 7; 
Class Debating Team 4, 5, 6; School Debating 
Team 6, 7; Head English Librarian 6, 7. 

Irwin, our "dean" of the English library, 
helped revive the Atom during his senior year. 
His work with the science publication whetted 
his appetite for science, and he will study 
chemistry at City College. 

"Librarians are wiser men than others." 
Emerson 



IRWIN HANDEL 

Head of Mishmar 7, 8; Kolenu 5-8; Arista 7, 
8; School Charity collector 5, 6, 8; Service 
Squad 3; Hebrew Library Book Agency Head 
5-8; Member of Y.O.C. 5, 6; Chairman 7, 8. 

Irwin quietly spent his four years compiling 
a fine scholastic and extracurricular record. 
The "minyon", the "mishmar" and the Y.O.C. 
each profited from his able leadership. He 
will continue his studies at Yeshiva, trying to 
emulate Rabbi Karlin as both a mathematician 
and a rabbi. 

"But his delight is in the law of the Lord." 
Psalms 



"Ohher is er kosher?" 




22 





Our campus 



JEROME HORNBLASS 

Varsity Debating Team 5, 6; J.V. Debating 
Team 2, 4; Topics Bulletin Associate Editor 
7, Txpist 4, 5, 6, Reporter 4, 5, 6; Varsity 
Basketball Team 5, 6; J.V. BasketbaU Team 3; 
Class Debating Team 1, 2, 4, 5, 6; Variety 
Nite 2, 4; School Glee Club 1, 2. 

Jerry, who had the distinction of being on 
most of the extracurricular activities was the 
class reformer. His editorials on "Yiddishkeit" 
helped stabilize the senior class. He will major 
in science at Yeshiva. 

"He preaches well who lives well." 
Cervantes 






DAVID JACOBS 

Science Club 1-4; Hebrew Culture Club 5-8. 

David, our expert in languages, displayed 
his linguistic proficiency by effectively "rank- 
ing" in three languages. He will continue giv- 
ing his rabbis "naches" at Yeshiva, where he 
will study for the rabbinate. 

"It matters not what you are, but what you 
are thought to be." 
Syrus 



NORMAN KAHAN 

Kolenu Editor 5-8; Class Vice President 8; 
Secretary Treasurer 6; Arista 6-8; Topics Staff 
5-7; Debating Team 5, 6; Service Squad 7; 
English Librarian 5; Hebrew Librarian 6. 

Normy, a late-comer to our school, proved 
his worth by compiling one of the highest 
averages in the senior class. His major contri- 
bution was the reestablishment of a successful 
Kolenu magazine. He will go on to study math 
and science at Yeshiva. 
"Tis good-will makes intelligence." 
Emerson 



Eager 



23 





STANLEY KAPLAN 

School Debating Team; Class Vice-President 
8, Secretary Treasurer; Debating Team 5; 
Athletic Manager 7; Junior Varsity Basketball 
Team 3, 4; Service Squad 3, 5, 7, Lieutenant 
8; Hebrew Library Squad 5. 

Slan, though shorl, was a fine basketball 
player and an all-around athlete. With his 
dynamic personality and will to win, he led 
his class to many intra-mural victories. He 
will switch from athletics to math at Brook- 
lyn this year. 

"Wit and wisdom are born with a man." 
Selden 



ALLEN KEZSBOM 

Arista 6-8; Class President 7; Debating Man- 
ager 6: Topics Managing Editor 8, News Editor 
6-7, Reporter 2-5; School Debating Manager 
5; Varsity Debating Team 3-8; Class Debating 
Team 2-8; Variety Night 3, 4, 7, 8; Leader of 
Cheerleaders 7, 8; Service Squad Captain 7; 
Hebrew Library 4, 5; Kolenu 5, 8. 

After declining Swarthmore in favor of 
Brooklyn, Al became a good friend of Rabbi 
Zuroff. Known for reporting seniors for leav- 
ing the building, he later had a complete change 
of heart and led them in the Senior Secession. 
He will begin preparation for a medical career 
this fall. 

"Whoso would be a man must be a non- 
conformist." 

Emerson 





i' 



k"$$i 



ARTHUR KELLMAN 

Variety Nite 5, 7; Service Squad 1, 2, 7; English 
Library Squad 5, 6, 7; Office Squad 2, 7; Audio 
Visual Squad 5, 6; Atom Staff 5. 
Ian, as he was popidarly known, managed to 
reach "sweet sixteen" before leaving Y.U.H. 
S.B. He was another pioneer of the Radio 
Club, and also a licensed amateur radio oper- 
ator. He will begin his studies toward a career 
in medicine at Brooklyn College this fall. 
"K2UMO" 

Federal Communications Commission 



Young man with ideas. 



24 



After the ball is over. 






SHELDON KRAMER 

Varsity Basketball Team Captain 7, 8; Varsity 
Basketball team 3-8; Class Debating Manager 
7; Class Debating Team 1, 7; Chess Team 7-8. 
Shelly' s jump shot led Y.U.H.S.B. to many 
a victory on the basketball court. As Captain 
of the Varsity team, he was respected by all the 
students. He will leave basketball this fall to 
study psychology at Y.U. 

"When the One Great Scorer comes 

to write against your name- 
He marks— not that you won or lost, 
but how you played the game." 
Rice 



DANIEL LEVINE 

Class President 7; Co-Captain Varsity Basket- 
ball Team 7, 8; Varsity Basketball Team 3-8; 
Class Athletic Manager 3, Debating Manager 
1; Debating Team 2, 5, 7; School Debating 
Team 5; Variety Nite 8. 

Danny, who surprised everyone by entering 
Rabbi Yogel's class, is considered one of the 
nicest guys around. Always ready with a quick 
joke, Danny was also dextrous on the basket- 
ball court. He wilt continue aggravating Frost 
at Y.U. 

"You can never tell what's going to happen 
when a man takes his first drink." 
O. Henry 



HARRY MEZEI 

Service Squad 5; Variety Nite 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; 
Y.O.C. 7, 8; English Library 7, 8; Hebrew Li- 
brary 7; Atom Staff 7; Public Relations Com- 
mission 7. 

Harry, an active organizer and participant 
in the morning "Minyan" , was known as a 
quiet and likeable fellow during his four years 
at Y.U.H.S.B. A voracious appetite for read- 
ing will lead him to a degree in the arts at 
Brooklyn next year. 

"And fools who came to scoff, remained to 
pray." 

Goldsmith 



25 





MURRAY MEDNICK 

Arista 5-8, Vice-leader 7; Elchanite Business 
Manager 7, 8; Class President 6, Vice Presi- 
dent 4, Debating Manager 7; Business Man- 
ager 5; Newspaper Distributor 6; School 
Debating Team 5, 6; Class Debating Team 
1-8; Office Squad 3; Service Squad 4-6, Cap- 
tain 8, Lieutenant 7; Hebrew Library 3. 

After losing the battle for the vice-presi- 
dency, Murray switched parlies and became 
Service Sqitad captain. A conscientious stu- 
dent, he succeeded in becoming Arista Vice- 
Leader. He will study math and rabbinics at 
Yeshiva. 

"Alone at nights, I read my Bible more and 
Euclid less." 

Buchanan 



JACK NEUFELD 

School Debating Manager 7; Topics Staff 5, 
6; Track Team 4-8; Class Debating Team 1-8; 
Variety Night 5, 7; Service Squad 2-4; Library 
Squad 1, 2, 6. 

Jack was one of the more active students 
in Y.U.H.S.B.'s extracurricular program. His 
tenure as school debating manager was very 
successful and pared the way for future of- 
ficers. He will broadjump from track to a civil 
engineering degree. 

"He could manage this matter to a T." 
Steine 



NOEL NUSBACHER 

Student Court Justice 5; Arista 5-8; Arista 
Secretary Treasurer 7; Class President 3; El- 
chanite Art Editor 7, 8; Topics Sports Editor 
7, 8, Staff 5, 6; Variety Nite Leader 7, 8; Var- 
iety Nite 5, 6; Service Squad 2; Chief Enghsh 
Librarian 5. 

Although he suffered reverses at the polls, 
Nuss kept his popularity nevertheless with his 
musical and journalistic abilities, his "small 
portable instrument" being a great asset in 
Mr. Strum's class. The senior musician will 
continue his studies at Yeshiva. 

"1 am not a politician and my other habits 
are good." 

Ward 



26 




Rabbi Yogel's . 





through the air . . . 



NATHAN ORENBUCH 

Chess Team 5,: 6, Captain 7, 8; Service Squad 
3-6; Varsity Debating Team 5, 6; Class De- 
bating Team 3-6. 

Natty's senior year in Rabbi Karlin's class 
will undoubtedly aid him in his future career, 
psychology. He sharpened his wits as captain 
of the Chess Team and financed his way by 
selling stamps. A "regular" at the senior 
lounge, he will study at Yeshiva. 

"He was a good fellow." 
Chaucer 






LARRY PADWA 

Elchanite Activities Editor 7, 8; Class Debat- 
ing Team 7; Varsity Track Team 6; Service 
Squad 5, 7; Office Squad 5; Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 8. 

Larry, normally a mild-mannered student, 
found an outlet for his emotions in Sam's 
class. Nicknamed "The Wizard" because of 
his superior ability in mathematics, Larry 
cashed in at Regents time. He will study math 
at Brooklyn College. 

"Oib er vill, ken er!" 
Peterovsky 



. swee-touch-nee. 



BENNETT PALLANT 

Arista 5-8, Secretary-Treasurer 8: Topics Cir- 
culation Manager 8, Business Staff 1, 4, 5, 6; 
Swimming Team 5-8; Service Squad 2, 6; Eng- 
lish Library 4, 5; Hebrew Library Book 
Agency 5; Class Debating Team 2. 

Bennett quietly maintained a high average 
in both the Talmud and secular departments, 
but he "erupted" nevertheless in Mr. Strum's 
class, as well as on the school swimming team. 
Capitalizing on his flair for math and science, 
Bennett will study physics at Yeshiva. 

"Logical consequences are the scarecrows of 
fools and the beacons of wise men." 
Huxley 



27 





^m- 




JAY PARNESS 

Service Squad 4, 5, 7; Audio-visual Squad 
5-7; Hebrew Glee Club 3; Class Debating 
Team 6. 

Jay, our original ham, kept the "Chick" 
alert with his interesting and usually off-beat 
questions. One of the founders of the radio 
club, he can always be reached at K2PBS. He 
will continue studying electronics at Brooklyn 
College. 

"I only ask for information." 
Dickens 



JULES PUGACH 

Arista 1, 8; Atom reporter 1, 2; Class Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 7; Class Debating Team 1, 2; 
Service Squad 2, 4, 5, Lieutenant 8. 

Jules' trait of never saying "no" to anyone 
made him known as the most good-natured 
senior. The man who always did his history 
homework, he always remained without it un- 
til Marty's period. He will continue his studies 
at Brooklyn College. 

"Men of few words are the best of men." 
Shakespeare 



28 





NECHEMIAH REISS 

G.O. Vice-President 7; Class Vice-President 6, 
Secretary-Treasurer 3-5; Arista 5-8; Service 
Squad 1; Hebrew Library Squad 2-6. 

Nicky, the dark horse candidate for veep, 
remained loyal to the G.O. during the Senior 
Secession. His mathematical ability led him to 
be an "instructor for a day" in Mr. Mayer's 
class. He will further his mathematical prowess 
at Brooklyn College. 

"If a man's wit be wandering, let him study 
mathematics." 

Bacon 



, beyond the earth . 




G.O. office, headquarters for politics and publications. 




BERNARD ROSEN 

Class Debating Team 4, 5; Athletic Manager 
3, 8; Varsity Handball Team 5, 6. 

Our ambassador to the Calskills, Bernie was 
one of Mr. Lilker's favorite targets. A regular 
customer at Jack's, he gained fame by com- 
pleting unfinished crosswords. His hidden tal- 
ents will come to light when he studies engi- 
neering at City College. 

"They also serve who only stand and wait." 
Milton 





ABRAHAM ROSENBERG 

Elchanite Literary Editor 7, 8; Arista 7, 8; 
Kolenu Staff 5, 6; Atom Staff 5, 6; Topics 
Staff 7, 8; English Library 5, 6; Research Squad 
School Debating Team 5. 

Abe, who came to us by way of Europe, was 
our poet laureate. In spite of his quiet exterior, 
he proved to be "one of the boys". He will 
follow up his strong interest in science atjd 
prepare for a career in engineering. 

"The pen is mightier than the sword, but a 
good sword helps." 
Faivel 



DAVID ROSENMAN 

Student Court Chief Justice 7; Arista 5-8; 
Varsity Handball Team 7-8; Topics 3-8; Ko- 
lenu 3-4; Class Debating Team 3; Service 
Squad 5. 

Davy, who for some strange reason, never 
received an unexcused admit, was elected Stu- 
dent Court Justice because of his impartiality 
and honesty. He quietly compiled a fine schol- 
astic record and will continue to do so while 
majoring in engineering at City. 

"An honest man's word is as good as his 
bond." 

Cervantes 



29 





JERRY ROTH 

Topics Staff 1-8; Varsity Handball Team 5, 6. 

During his slay at Y.U.H.S.B., Jerry gained 
fame by supponing two poliiical points of 
view at once and by drinking two containers 
of milk every recess period. Attracted by math 
and science, he will study engineering at City 
next term. 

"Good things come in small packages." 
Bar-Fro 



SIMON RUBIN 

Class Vice-President 5, Secretary-Treasurer 7, 
Athletic Manager 2; Variety Nite 1-8; J. V. 
Basketball Team 2, 3; Service Squad" 3, 4; 
Kolenu 1, 2; Topics Business Staff 1, 2, 

Sammy used his voice, charm, good looks 
and dancing ability well enough to be elected 
class Casanova. "Mr. Poco Palo's" five years 
of experience will aid him greatly in his next 
four years at Yeshiva. 

"Old age is a good and pleasant time." 
Harrison 




SHELDON SCHECHTER 

Arista 5-8; Elchanite Typing Staff 5; Topics 
Typing Staff 4; Kolenu 4; Variety Nite 3-4; 
Service Squad 4; Hebrew Library Staff 4-5; 
Co-op Staff 4; Student Court Justice 8. 

"Shloim", another Williainsburgh boy, was 
a regular customer at Mrs. Rosenman's desk. 
A two year veteran of Rabbi Yogel's class, he 
was the class translator of "Villiamsburger" 
Yiddish to "Oxford Accent" English. He will 
study engineering at Yeshiva. 

"Good children should never be lazy and 
sad." 

Hastings 




So what! You can always go to Yeshiva.' 



30 





Rabhi Yogel "sheps nachas. 



ARNOLD SCHLIEFER 

Class Debating Team 2, 3, 5. 

Arnie, who spent much of his four years ex- 
plaining how he acquired his nickname, was 
one of the quietest fellows in the senior class. 
Likeable and sincere, Arnie will continue mak- 
ing friends at City. 

"The only way to have a friend is to be one." 
Emerson 






JOEL SCHNURE 

Student Court Justice 7; Elchanite Typing 
Editor 7-8; Topics Feature Editor 5-8, Staif 
1-8; Class Debating Manager 1; School De- 
bating Team 5-8; Class Debating Team 1, 5, 
7, 8; Captain Track Team 4-8; Director Of 
Cheerleaders 7-8; Service Squad 3-5; Eng. Li- 
brary 5; Hebrew Library 2. 

Although mainly preoccupied with talking, 
writing and running, "J. J." found time to 
notice the Doc's attire. As feature editor of 
the Topics, he became the senior who knew 
the faculty best. Completely captivated by sci- 
ence, J.J. will study biochemistry at Brooklyn: 

"Life's a race well run." 
Parker 



DAVID SEGAL 

Student Court Justice (Alternate) 7; Photog- 
raphy Editor Elchanite 7, 8; Atom Typing Edi- 
tor 7, 8; Variety Nite 3; English Library Squad 
4; Arista 8. 

As Elchanite photography editor, Dave be- 
came known for his photographic inspirations. 
His interest in rockets and his activities on the 
Atom are evidence of his ability in science. He 
will further develop this ability in the fall, 
when he begins pre-med studies at Yeshiva. 

"1 am a camera." 

Hollywood 



31 





ABRAHAM SHIFF 

Class Vice-President 1; Elchanite Art Squad 
1-8; Office Assistant 5-8; English Library 
Squad 3-4; School Charity Collector 5, 6; 
Topics Bulletin Staff 7, 8. 

An ardent worker and effiecient miineo- 
grapher, Sam was always ready to do anyone 
a favor. His frequent quoting from Mark 
Twain showed his great love for literature. 
Fascinated by science fiction, he will try to 
outdo H. G. Wells at Brooklyn. 

"Reading maketh a full man." 
Bacon 



ELI SHUMAN 

Kashruth Commission 3-8, Head 7, 8; Service 
Squad 4-7; Topics Typing Squad 5, 6. 

Eli, voted our most pious senior, came to 
us from Public School. He not only success- 
fully handled the candy concessions, but also 
assured us of kosher sweets. Eli will continue 
his religious studies at Y. U. in the fall, 

"And your character with piety is packed." 
Graham 





ever rapidly . 



JACOB SIEGAL 

Elchanite Typing Squad 3; Topics Feature 
Staff 1; Photography Squad 2; Swimming 
Team 5-6; School Debating Team; Reasearch 
Squad 3-4; English Library Squad 3; Variety 
Nite 3, 5; Hebrew Glee Club 3; Chagiga 5-8. 

Jack, our after-dinner speaker, made a habit 
of running around the yard once a day. His 
wit and ability to impersonate others led to 
his appointment as M.C. of our Chagigas. 
Jack will study for a degree in bio-chem at 
Brooklyn. 

"Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery." 
Paine 



"Peshy and I spent our honeymoon here 







DANIEL SIEGFRIED 

Arista 5-8; Class President 4, Vice-President 
2-3; Debating team 6; Topics Staff 5-7; Serv- 
ice Squad 4-6; Office Squad 7. 

Danny's house was the focal point of pre- 
test activity, Sammy and Bernie being the 
most active participants. Danny, who acquired 
a taste for tea as a resuh of his senior year, 
wit study chemistry at Brooklyn. 

"And gladly would he learn and gladly 
teach." 

Chaucer 



MORRIS SIMNOWITZ 

Class Vice-President 7; Class Athletic Mana- 
ger 1-4, 6; J. V. Basketball Team 3-4; Class 
Secretary Treasurer 8; J.V. Basketball Coach 
7-8. 

Publicized by the Topics as "modest 
Moishe", Morris was considered one of the 
most likeable students in the school. His com- 
mand of athletics manifested itself in his suc- 
cessful coaching of the J. V. "The hoop" will 
become another mathematical symbol as he 
majors in math at Brooklyn. 

"Not a saint or a sinner, but just the very 
best of chaps." 

Bar-Fro 



PHILIP SINGER 

Atom Editor-in-Chief 3-8; Elchanite Photog- 
raphy Squad 7, 8; Topics Business Staff 2; 
Manager of Co-op 3-8; President of Radio 
Club 5-8; Hebrew Library Staff 1, 2; Office 
Squad 5, 6. 

Phil, our electronics expert, was always 
ready to give you a good deal on anything 
from hi-fi sets to ordinary radio lubes. An 
electrical engineering degree will be his goal 
when he enters City this fall. 

"Get money; still get money boy, no matter 
by what means." 

Jonson 





PAUL STEIN 

Student Court Justice 7; Arista 5-8; Leader 7; 
Literary Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; Elchanite 
Literary Staff 6; Topics "Bulletin" 3, 5, 6; 
School Debating Manager 6; Class Vice-Presi- 
dent 8; Debating Manager 2-5; Debating Team 
1-8; Chess Team 3, 4; Variety Nite 1, 2; Serv- 
ice Squad 3, 4. 

Paul was the shining literary star of the 
senior class. His interests ranged from writing 
poetry to playing basketball, and he was al- 
ways available for an argument on philosophy. 
He will begin work on a career in law at 
Columbia this fall. 

"A poet is born, not made." 
Fr-ien 



STEVEN STEIN 

Topics Editor in Chief, 7, 8; Business Manager 
5, 6; Elchanite Activities Editor 7, 8; Class 
President 5, 6; Secretary Treasurer 4; Topics 
Business Staff 1-5; Class Debating Team 5, 6; 
Co-op Salesman 4. 

Steve, the owner of the "House on Linden 
Boulevard" and our final authority on Cen- 
trifugal Bumble Puppy, spent many a day 
doing headlines in Rabbi Karlin's Class. His 
affinity for science will lead him to a career in 
chemistry at N.Y.U. come next fall. 

"Then hail the press, chosen guardian of 
freedom." 

Greely 



MAURICE STRAHLBERG 

Class President 4, Vice-President 1, 3, Secre- 
tary Treasurer 2, Athletic Manager 5; Arista 
5-8; Hebrew Library 2, 3; English Library 4, 
5, Assistant Chief 6; Topics Business Staff 3, 
7; Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8; Junior 
Varsity 3; School Charity Collector 8. 

Moish, who was active in all Y.U.H.S.B. 
monetary affairs, led the parade in carrying 
roast chicken to Washington. His future as- 
pirations are in contrast to his past business 
interests since he will study psychiatry at 
Y.U. 

"With malice toward none, with charity for 
all." 

Lincoln 



"Boy, was that exam tough' 



34 






MARTIN STROBEL 

President of G.O. 7; Elchanite Co-Editor 7-8; 
Arista Vice Leader 6; Arista 4-8; Class Presi- 
dent 1, 3, Vice-President 5, Secretary Treasurer 
6; Class Debating Team 3-7; Topics News 
Staff 1-4, Feature Staff 4-6; Varsity Debating 
Team 4-8; Service Squad 4. 

Marty, the best dressed man in the senior 
class, was extremely active in our extracur- 
ricular program. Noted for his affinity for 
politics and ability in debating, he will talk his 
way through a pre-law course at Columbia. 

"Charm us, Orator, till the lion look no 
larger than the cat." 

Tennyson 





JEROLD SUSSMAN 

Service Squad Captain 7; Class Debating 
Team 2; Class Charity Collector 1-2; Service 
Squad 1-7. 

Jerry's beginning on the service squad was 
inconspicuous enough but he rose rapidly and 
was named Captain in his senior year. Always 
willing to help out, he participated actively 
in school chagigahs and other functions. Ac- 
countancy will be his goal at City. 

"The highest of distinctions is service to 
others." 

King George VI 



STANLEY SUSSMAN 

Elchanite Photography Editor 7-8; Topics 
Photography Editor 7-8, Business Staff 5-6, 
Feature Staff 5-6, Bulletin Reporter 5-8; Class 
Debating Manager 1-4; J.V. Basketball Team 
5-6; Service Squad 7-8. 

Stan's interests ranged from journalism to 
photography to debating during his four year 
stay at Y.U.H.S.B. His experience on the J.V. 
Basketball Squad made hint a natural leader 
in class athletic competition. He will go on 
to study dentistry this fall. 

"One picture is worth a thousand words." 
Chinese Proverb 



35 





\ 




MARCEL WACHSTOCK 

Minyon Gabai 4-8; Atom Staff 5-7; Service 
Squad 5, 6; Y.O.C. 7, 8. 

Marcel, one of the pioneers of the "minyan" 
and Y.O.C, devoted much of hi.s slay at 
Y.U.H.S.B. to increasing the scope of the 
school's religious activity. He will prepare for 
a career in social work at Brooklyn College. 

"The reward of a thing well done is to have 
done it." 

Emerson 



MORRIS WEINSTEIN 

Class Secretary Treasurer 2; Elchanite Busi- 
ness Manager 4; Elchanite Photography Squad 
7; Class Debating Team 6; English Library 
Squad 4; Chess Team 7; Variety Nite 1-4, 7-8; 
Service Squad 7; Office Squad 3-4; Varsity 
Bowling Team 8, 

Moish, one of Marty's playmates, trumped 
his way through Y.U.H.S.B. while improving 
his bowling average. Although generally con- 
sidered a quiet individual, Moish came to life 
in Rabbi Karlin's class. He will study business 
administration at City College. 

"Let spades be trumps!", said he, "and 
trumps they were." 

Pope 



BARNET WEINSTOCK 

Elchanite Editor-in-Chief 7, 8; Arista 4-8, 
Leader 6; Student Court Secretary 6, 7; Class 
President 1-3, 5, Vice-President 4, 6; Debating 
Team 2, 4; Topics Managing Editor 6, 7, Copy 
Editor 5, Staff 2-4; Kolenu writer 6; Labora- 
tory Assistant 2-8. 

Top grades, politics and a fantastic extra- 
curricular record highlight Barney's four years 
at Y.U.H.S.B. His flair for journalism led him 
to top positions on both The Topics and El- 
chanite. Leaving Y.U.H.S.B. with a truckful of 
awards, Barney will study math at Columbia. 

"The mathematician has reached the highest 
rung on the ladder of human thought." 
Ellis 




towards the horizon. 



36 




E 
L 
C 
H 



to 




dvance towards horizons. 



STEVEN ZAVELOFF 

Class Debating Team 4; Lab Ass't 1-8; Audio 
Visual Commission Head 3-8. 

Steve's scientific ability evidenced itself in 
his reaching the semi-finals of the Westing- 
house Science Talent Search. His efforts led to 
the establishment of a successful audio-visual 
commission. An electrical engineering degree 
will be his goal at Brooklyn Poly. 

"I perceive by certain evidences thine ability 
to learn sciences." 

Chaucer 



N 
I 

T 
E 




37 




n o r s 



National Merit Scholarship Corporation 

Merit Scholarship 
Barnet Weinstock 

Certificate of Merit 
Joel Grossman 

Letter of Recommendation 
Steven Goldman 



General Motors Scholarship Program 

General Motors National Scholarship 
Barnet Weinstock 



Mayor's Committee Award 

To The Student Who Ranks Highest In His High School Studies 
Barnet Weinstock 



Westinghouse Science Talent Search 

Semi-finalists 

Barnet Weinstock 

Steven Zaveloff 

Future Scientists of America 

National Science Achievement Award 
Barnet Weinstock 

New York State Scholarships 



Robert Apsel 
Henry Belman 
Steven Goldman 
Henry Goodman 
Joel Grossman 
Irwin Haas 
Norman Kahan 
Ian Arthur Kellman 



Allan Kezbom 
Murray Mednick 

* Jacob Neufeld 
Noel Nusbacher 

''Bennett Pallant 
Jules Pugach 
Abraham Rosenberg 
David Rosenman 



Gerald Roth 

Sheldon Schechter 

Paul Stein 
^Steven Stein 

Maurice Strahlberg 

Martin Strobel 
''Barnet Weinstock 

Steven Zaveloff 



Alternates 
Warren Enker David Jacobs 
Irwin Handel Bernard Rosen 



•■'Also State Science Schotership 



38 




S H M 



N 



IHUHO 



apparel. 





TOLD to report to new building — couldn't find 
any . . . Morse tells us we're the dumbest freshie 
class ever . . .Civics teacher gives us lesson in smil- 
ing zeros . . . Kallner opens pumice stone factory 
next to "shadchen " bureau . . . Patriotic mvisic 
teacher sings "My Country 'Tis of Thee" — Stock 
Market drops three points . . . CO. elections— milk 
bottles vs. beer bottles . . . Public speaking club 
with Fast Moe: "The poipus of this club is to loin 
to speak correct". . . Parness sees flying saucers- 
predicts end of the world . . . Y. U. invites us up- 
town for Shavuoth. Frost gets locked out at 2 A.M. 
. . . 'We get our first introduction to the "Old Man 
and the Tea" and get "upgechecked." Kallner tries 
to breed drosoph . . . drosoph . . . fruit flies. . . . 

Strum: Don't do your math homework now. 

Student: When should I do it? 

Strum: What do you think the Talmud class is 
for? . . . 



DIARY 



"You'll never be an athlete.' 




Shepsy trades in his slowboat for a bicycle at the 
Lag Ba'omer outing . . . Do all English teachers 
keep windows wide open during snowstorms? . . . 
News brief — At physicals we discover that T.A. 
boys prefer "Short Shorts". . . . Kallner introduces 
two new pieces of wearing apparel — ties and 
"tszitsziss". . . Elchanite celebrates 7 th anniversary 
of Israel . . . Bob "Bachelor" Bassell gets hooked 
. . . Turetsky opens Camp Sohcahtoa . . . Mr. Gold 
is the best English teacher. Just ask him. He marks 
compositions very liberally — 97/35 . . . Club 
period called off while Godin "impartially" tells us 
to take French . . . Students who bring in two dental 
notes get 101% in Health Ed. . . . Frankel proves 
conclusively that we don't exist. After marks we 
tend to agree with him . . . Morse hits Enker in the 
head with a golf club — Enker apologizes ... As 
the year ends, we're all wondering who Nelson is . . . 



39 



SOPHOMORES 



WE rise from general science to "bology". . . 
Brender finds himself in trouble when the 
inspector from Albany understands French . . . 

Sei'ior: If you don't behave I'll call your parents. 

Student: My mother and father? 

Senor: No, just your parents . . . 
Elchanite celebrates Israel's 8th anniversary . . . 
Bassell confines Odyssey test to questions on the 
Iliad. More of a challenge that way . . . Lichty 
overestimates us and teaches Aleph-Beiss . . . Why 
do students who watch Buster Crabbe on T.V. get 
90% with Mr. Gallant? . . . Teddy offers friendly 
advice — flunk now and avoid the rush. What a 
buddy . . . Julie replaced by Soprano bio teacher 
who likes to draw diagrams . . . Debates in Bob's 
class — Resolved: Girls should allow liberties . . . 
Epstein tells Kaplan to go to the beach instead of 
taking the geometry regents. Kaplan gets 90% any- 
way. Walrus jumps in lake . . . Moe's English im- 




"Soikle Woik" 

proves. Now teaches soikle woik . . . We're intro- 
duced to Shepsie who tells us he's in the book busi- 
ness. He cleans up on bets until we wise up . . . In 
honor of the 92nd anniversary of the Battle of 
Gettysburg. Doc makes us memorize the Gettys- 
burg Address - in HEBREW . . . 

Student: But Mr. Morse, aren't rubbers the same 

as sneakers? 

Mr. Morse: You're even dumber than the 

fresh ies . . . 



How to pass the bio regents: 

Julie — If you don't know the answer, write 
"therefore." 

T.K. — If you don't know the answer write "os- 
mosis." 
Tried both, and flunked anyway . . . Stein finishes 
his fourth term with Mr. Turetsky . . . We leave 
Brooklyn Talmudical Academy for the last time. 



U N I 



WE start our junior year with a bang, as Doc 
steps on a torpedo . . . We find out that our 
new French teacher is actually an "old man" . . . 
Elchanite celebrates 9th anniversary of Israel . . . 
Minky gives "zeros for the period" with a nose dive 
. . . Stein begins fifth term with Fast Mo. "Stein. 
You here again? Pipe down, pipe down". . . . 

Cluck — What do you know about nitrates? 

Zook — They're cheaper than day rates . . . 
Moveable desks are put into the French room. 
Average mark on dictation goes up . . . We now get 
4 '4 ... Paul Stein falls asleep in the barber chair 
. . . Minkv threatens to quit. Promises! Promises! 
Well the climate is better in St. Paul anyway . . . 




40 




Flying saucers land in Doc's class. "You have ten 
seconds to tell me who did it. Time is up. You have 
one minute." . . . Kenny defends the Police De- 
partment. They reward him with a new ashtray 
. . . French teacher displays latest styles in men's 
footwear . . . 

Student — Where should I sit Mr. Wallach? 

Mr. Wallach — Sit on the floor and let your feet 

dangle . . . 

Chemistry Student — But Mr. Lebowitz, how 

come you don't get a shock? 

Mr. Lebowitz — Only a cluck would touch both 

wires . . . AAAH . . . 




Overheard in Talmud class: Complain. Please com- 
plain! . . . "And if they tell you to fold your papers, 
just tell them that Old Man Godin told you not to." 
. . . Typical question on Hebrew tests: Write all 
you know about the life of the author's grand- 
father!!?? . . . Senor spends half the period looking 
for David Oro . . . But Dr. Horwitz, what is that 
famous quotation everybody knows?" "Er, er, I 
don't remember it right now.". . . 




"The Easy Life of a Senior" 



Rabbi Kariin takes twelve seconds off recess . . . 
Turetsky pulls a switch and asks if anyone has the 
homework?. . . Senor goes into the banking busi- 
ness as he "settles our accounts". . . . Turetsky goes 
on vacation. Sends in sub who supplies free um- 
brellas . . . Strum to overanxious students — "Don't 
erupt, this isn't a Talmud class" . . . Office begins 
suspensions for lateness . . . Attention: Slick Willy 
now accepting members for "The Flowers That 
Bloom In The Spring" Club. Admission require- 
ments — 25 words or less on "Why Chewing Gum 
is Barbaric" . . . Year ends, and we get ready to 
live the "easy" life of a senior. 



41 



N I 



WE return to find a new math teacher. But Mr. 
Mayer, one and one is two, not three . . . 
September census — Five boys going to Y.U. . . . 
Mr. Strum decides he had better prepare grammar 
lessons in advance . . . Attention all seniors: Break 
all matches and put out all camp fires. Smokey the 
Bear is on the warpath . . . 




Sam shuts window to prevent boys from looking 
out. But Reb. Great new western invention— Glass!! 
. . . Eco teacher corrupts our morals. Draws rec- 
tangles on the blackboard . . . "What is an essential 
part of every electric cell?" Kaplan— A nucleus . . . 
But Rabbi Zuroff, there's no freedom in the school 
. . . Buddy shows his affection by instituting oral 
recitations . . . News Brief— Strike at John's Bargain 
Store . . . Mr. Purcell— I've been observing you for 
three months and I've come to the conclusion that 
you're an idiot. Duuhh . . . Marty refuses to give out 
Central phone numbers. Says he doesn't want us to 
get stuck too . . . 

Mr. Lebowitz: "What cluck taught you ele- 
mentary algebra?" 

Student: "The same one that's trying to teach me 
physics". . . . 
December College Board results announced; ten 
boys going to Y.U. . . . Mr. Mayer develops new 
teaching method — Let Barney do it . . . Pete's class 
celebrates National Dental Day . . . "He's Every- 
body's Buddy" is the new senior theme song . . . 
Kaplan challenges Purcell when he denounces 
Williamsburg's economy . . . Rubin collects rent. 
Finds out who Nelson is . . . City College applicants 
notified. Yeshiva registration increases . . . Rabbi 




Strobel and Belman become school officers, promise big 
sweep. 

Yogel wonders why Nick sleeps in class. Thinks 
he's up nights playing cards . . . Rosen decides to 
make guest appearance at school . . . Stein makes 
boo-boo. April issue of Topics becomes rare col- 
lectors' item . . . We celebrate Israeli Independence 
Day with our own parade. Room 204 is locked as a 
safety measure . . . Rabbi Karlin gives up on Gemo- 
rah. Teachs math and physics instead . . . State 
Scholarship results appear. Purcell is certain there 
was some mistake . . . Brand wins Oscar for poetry 
recital . . . Finals, Regents . . . Graduation finally 
arrives . . . We go out into the world, but will always 
remember our four years at Y.U.H.S.B. . . . 



42 




E 
L 
C 
H 
A 




ACTIVITIES 



to 




avigate humanity through all obstacles. 



r 

T 
E 



43 



SERVING as coordinator of the school's nu- 
merous extracurricular activities is the Gen- 
eral Organization. As the main organ of student 
government it strives to create greater student 
interest in its varied program. 

This past school year, 1957-58, was charac- 
terized by increased student participation and 
interest, making it a most fruitful year of accom- 
plishment for the G.O. 





fall term 



Left to right, Seated: M. Shapiro, H. Fruchter. D. Goldmacher. Secretary-Treasurer D. Lazar, 
President M. Strobel, Vice-President H. Belman. B. Hulkower. A. Weinberg, Standing; M. Kezs- 
bom. J. Rappaport, E. Lowenstein, D. Levine. B. Beer, K. Prager. P. Stein, A. Flamholz, M. 
Wolf, IVI. Simnowitz, J. Flamholz, J. Granchow. 



One of the highlights of G.O. activity is the 
semi-annual election campaign. The fall term 
elections saw Martin Strobel elected G.O. Presi- 
dent along with Henry Belman, Vice-President, 
David Lazar, Secretary-Treasurer, Jack Neufeld, 
Debating Manager, and Joe Leibowitz, Athletic 
Manager. 

In the spring term elections Henry Belman was 
elected President. Elected with Belman were 
Nechemiah Riess, Vice-President, David Lazar. 
Secretary-Treasurer for a second term, Tully 
Dershowitz, Debating Manager and Larry Haspel, 
Athletic Manager. 



\ 



i? 



44 



A major facet of G.O. activity is the assembly 
program. This past year's assembly schedule in- 
cluded a Freshman Orientation assembly to ac- 
quaint incoming students with our school, an 
Arista Induction and Awards assembly, a most 
enjoyable Chanukah Chagiga, and an entertain- 
ing Purim Chagiga. The remaining assemblies 
consisted of interscholastic debates and forums 
on timely and interesting topics. 

Another phase of G.O. activity is the club pro- 
gram. The various clubs, which meet every Sun- 
day, provide an outlet for the special interests of 
the students. The club program was supplemented 
this year by the formation of a Dramatics Club 
under the direction of Mr. Josef Brand. 




WJlWKeK. 




Left to right: Vice-President H. Belman, Faculty Advisor J. Strum, 
President M. Strobel, Secretary-Treasurer D. Lazar. 




spring term 



Left to right, Seated: M. Kellman, M. Pollacli, E. Lowenstein, Secretary-Treasurer D. Lazar, 
President H. Belman, Vice-president N. Reiss, S. Kaplan, M. Cohen, W. Goldman, Standing: 
M. Spitzer, M. Shapiro, H. Goldkranz, C. Adler,- M. Hochenstein, M. Wolf, M. Strobel, 
S. Schechter, K. Prager, N. Kahan, J. Feuer, M. Wolff, P. Schneider. 



45 




Variety Nite. our annual amateur show proved 
highly successful this year. Under the able direc- 
tion of Noel Nusbacher and Morton Waldman, 
Variety Nite provided an enjoyable evening for 
all who attended and also netted a large profit 
for the G.O. Treasury. 

In the field of interscholastic competition the 
G.O. is a member of the Metropolitan Jewish 
High School League for varsity basketball and 
the Inter- Yeshiva High School Student Council 
for chess, debating, swimming and track. 

Mr. Joseph B. Strum has served as Faculty 
Adviser to the G.O. since its inception. 




Left to right: Vice-President N. Reiss, Faculty Advisor, J, Strum, 
President H. Belman, Secretary-Treasurer D. Lazar. 




46 



fail term 




Left to right.- A. Flamholz, P. Stein, Chief Justice D. Rosenman, 
B. Weinstock, Alternate D. Segal. 



THE Student Court is the judicial branch of 
our student government. Composed of five 
justices and one alternate justice chosen by the 
Student Council, the court tries those accused 
by the Service Squad of violating school rules 
and regulations. 

At the Court's bimonthly meetings, each stu- 
dent summoned to appear is presented with the 
charges against him and is permitted to speak 
in his own behalf. The justices then discuss the 
case, and the offender if found guilty is required 
to serve detention or write an essay. 

The proceedings are supervised by Mr. Joseph 
B. Strum, Faculty Advisor, and are presided over 
by a Chief Justice chosen from among the jus- 
tices. Chief Justices this year were David Rosen- 
man, fall term, and Alex Flamholz, spring term. 




Student Court.., 



0(f 


) 

^ 


r^ 


1. 


^^0t^ ^ J^ 


ft 


r 


•^* ^' 


li 


A 


!^ 


■ 1 * 


(J 





spring term 



Left to right: S. Schechter, D. Goldmacher, T. Dershowitz. Chief 
Justice A. Flamholz, J. Neufeld. Alternate M. Strahlberg. 



47 




Left to right. Front row: J. Flamholz. M. Feldman, P. Schneider, Lieutenant H. Goodman, J. 
Grossman, Captain A. Kezsbom, Vice-President J. Sussman, Lieutenant M. Mednick, J. 
Granchrow, L. Lipnick, Second row: K. Klein, S. Bockstein, R. Tauber, J. Halpern, M. Bursky, 
H. Adelman, B. Hulkower, L. Ladin, J. Levenbrown, A. Cohen, J. Kestenbaum, S. Kaplan, 
J. Goldstein, Third row: M. Hochberg, L. Lundner, D. Goldkranz, S. Hoff, S. Sussman, B. Sirote, 
H. Abramowitz, L. Feiner. Fourth row: D. Friedlander, R. Gerstl, L. Padwa, H. Tanowirz, 
R. Apsel, J. Parness, A. Resner, J. Feuer, A. Marcus, G. Pollack, L Sheinman. 



fall term 



48 




MAINTAINING general decorum and help- 
ing to keep the school clean is the function 
of the Service Squad. Its forty members, chosen 
from a large number of applicants, fairly repre- 
sent each class in the school. 

Students reported by Service Squad members 
for violating school regulations are required to 
appear before the Student Court. When these stu- 
dents appear before the Court, the Service Squad 
members present the cases against them. 

The Service Squad is under the jurisdiction of 
the Vice-president, and is headed by two cap- 
tains, assisted by three lieutenants. They are re- 
sponsible for its smooth management. Fall term 
officers were Allan Kezsbom and Jerry Sussman, 
Captains, and Henry Goodman. Joel Grossman, 
and Murray Mednick, Lieutenants. Spring term 
officers were Henry Goodman and Murray Med- 
nick, Captains, and Philip Brumer, Stanley Kap- 
lan and Jules Pugach, Lieutenants. 




spring term 



Left to right, Front row: J. Granchow, B, Hulkower, Lieutenant P. Brummer. Lieutenant J. 
Pugach, Captain H. Goodman, Vice-President N. Reiss, Captain M. Mednick. Lieutenant S. 
Kaplan, R. Schechter, M. Wangrofsky. Second row: N. Orenbuch, M. Durst, H. Gralla, A. 
Goldstein, S. Berenholz, L. Chapman, J. Flamholz, M. Pollack, S. Deutsch, F. Rosen, J. Werblow- 
sky, K. Klein, L. Feiner. Third row: A. Marcus, R. Tauber, S. Liker, J. Levenbrown, M. Hoch- 
berg, G. Wolfe. Fourth row: G. Salzman, L Haas, B. Sirote, H. Kwitel, D. Berman, S, Plotch, 
M. Wolf, H. Abramowitz, D. Goldkranz, A. Rosner, J. Feuer, J. Botknecht, L Feigenblum. 
Fifth row: A. Weinberg, H. Leibowitz, A. Alexander, C. Horowitz, R. Levine. 



P a 



B 



1^ 






k' t 




^ . . i 




Left to right: A. Kezsbom, S. Stein, Faculty 
Advisor S. Gold, B. Weinstock, J. Schnure. 



THE Topics, our school newspaper, enjoyed 
one of its most successful seasons this year. 
Greatly improved in both format and content, 
The Topics was awarded a First Place Certificate 
in the 1957 contest of the Columbia Scholastic 
Press Association, and also received an All- 
Columbian Award for features. 



the TOPICS 



The paper is issued three times each term and 
contains school news and sports in addition to 
interesting features and provocative editorials. 
The Topics is issued through the Journalism club 
and was led this year by Steven Stein, Editor-in- 
Chief. Mr. Sidney Gold serves as Faculty Advisor. 




Left to right. Standing; A. Flamholz, D. Levine, J. Feuer, B. Pallant. N. 
Nusbacher. Seated: R. Bloch, Managing Editor B. Weinstock, Editor-in-chief 
S. Stein, Managing Editor A. Kezsbom, D. Epstein. 




50 




Left to right: Associate Editor D. Epstein, 
Editor-in-Chief H. Goodman, Associate Edi- 
tor J. Hornblass. 



dPtdgirQ 



SINCE its inception, three and a half years 
ago, The Topics Bulletin has been serving a 
dual purpose. Through its accurate news stories, 
the paper informs the students of what's going 
on in and around the school. Being a weekly 
publication, its news is accurate and is reported 
in a fresh and vigorous style. 

The other purpose of this mimeographed pub- 
lication is to editorialize, to comment on the 
news. Campaigning through its editorials for im- 
provements in all aspects of school affairs, the 
hard-hitting Bulletin serves as a thought-pro- 
voking publication. By candidly reviewing bad 
practices, offering constructive suggestions, and 
supporting what is right and proper, Editor-in- 
Chief Henry Goodman has made the Bulletin a 
highly regarded, influential paper. 




51 



CONTINUING its fine tradition our sixth an- 
nual Variety Nite was a huge success. The 
show, instituted six years ago to provide talented 
students with a chance to perform, was led this 
year by Noel Nusbacher and Morty Waldman and 
featured many interesting acts. 




im 



m 



VARIETY 



5^;^ 



The highlight of the show was Rabbi Jack 
Glickman, a professional magician who performed 
several intriguing stunts. Another feature was a 
one act drama, "A Night In an Inn", presented 
by the Dramatics Club under the supervision of 
Mr. Josef Brand. 



52 




The musical portion of the show featured songs 
by Henry Belman and by a quartet consisting 
of Jerome Hornblass, Howard Liebman, Shimon 
Rubin and Morty Waldman. The Variety Nite 
Band — Ira Gober, accordion, Benjamin Hulkower, 
drums, Noel Nushbacher, saxophone, and David 
Zomick, piano — rounded out the show with a 
medley of popular selections. 

Variety Nite was also a financial success. All 
proceeds from the show went to the G.O. treasury. 





W 



Left to right: N. Nusbacher, B. Hulkower, 
M. Durst, I. Gober, D. Zomick, H. Belman. 




ROENTGEN 

ARRHENIUS 

BECQUEREL 

KOCH 

PAVLOV 

ROOSEVELT 

KIPLING 

METCHNIKOFF 

MARCONI 

CURIE 

ROOT 

PLANCK 

HABER 

W/ILSON 

EINSTEIN 

FRANCE 

BOHR 

MILLIKAN 

YEATS 

SHAW 



AN integral part of any significant school pro- 
^ gram is a well run honor society. Arista, 
Y.U.H.S.B.'s honor society, serves to recognize 
the school's outstanding students. Its main func- 
tion lies in aiding students who are deficient in 
their studies. 

Prerequisites for admission to Arista are high 
scholastic attainment in both the Hebrew and 



54 



LEWIS 

ADAMS 

LANGMUIR 

GALSWORTHY 

UREY 

ANDERSON 

O'NEIL 

BUCK 

FERMI 

ERLANGER 

FLEMING 

HULL 

MULLER 

ELIOT 

FAULKNER 

RUSSELL 

BUNCHE 

PURCELL 

YUKAWA 

PAULI 

RABI 

LAWRENCE 

SCHWEITZER 

CHURCHILL 

MARSHALL 

MAURIAC 

KUSCH 

HEMINGWAY 

PAULING 

HAHN 

HEISENBERG 

CHADWICK 

DIRAC 

SCHRODINGER 

DE BROGLIE 

COMPTON 

GREGG 

MICHELSON 

VAN'T HOFF 

AST IN 

BANTING 

CAMUS 

SALK 

BUNCHE 

PIERSON 

YANG 

LEE 



ARISTA 



secular departments of our school, participation 
in extra-curricular activities, and fine character. 
After filling out an application in which he states 
his reasons for desiring to join Arista, the pros- 
pective applicant must be approved by the As- 
sembly (the Arista members themselves) and the 
Senate (consisting of faculty members). If he 
is approved, the new member is inducted at the 
Awards Assembly where he takes the Arista oath 
and is given his Arista pin and certificate. 

This term. Arista membership reached a new 
high of 45 members. Serving as faculty advisor 
to Arista is Mr. Samuel Lebowitz who has held 
this post since Arista's inception. Officers for the 
fall term were Paul Stein, Leader, Murray Med- 
nick, Vice-leader, and Noel Nusbacher, Secretary. 
Serving during the spring term were Joel Gross- 
man, Leader, Charles Cantor, Vice-leader, and 
Bennett Pallant, Secretary. 




Left to right, Seated: H. Tanowitz, Vice-Leader C. Cantor, Faculty Adviser S. Leibowitz, Leader 
J. Grossman, Secretary-Treasurer B. Pallanf. Standing: L. Lundner, D. Segal, H. Goldkrantz, 
G. Saltzman, M. Wolf, K. Prager, R. GerstI, M. Wolff, K. Klein. 



spring term 




Left to right. Standing: D. Siegfried, D. Sperling, M. Waldman, D. Goldmacher, C. Cantor, 
J. Pugach, M. Strobel, S. Schechter, S. Goldman, J. Grossman, A. Flamholz, N. Kahan, A. Rosen- 
berg, B. Weinstock, H. Belman, D. Rosenman. Second row: L Handel, D. Jacobson, P. Brumer, 
J. Rappaport, P. Horowitz, M. Sokal, H. Goodman, D. Lazar, D. Epstein. Bottom row: R. Bloch, 
M. Pollack, D. Zomick, B. Pallant, Vice-leader M. Mednick, Faculty Adviser S. Leibowitz, 
Leader P. Stein, Secretary-Treasurer N. Nusbacher, N. Reiss, M. Strahlberg, A. Kezsbom. 



tall term, 




55 




Left to right: N. Nusbacher, M. Mednick, T. Dershowitz, P. Stein, 
S. Goldmab, J. Neufeld, M. Strobel, H. Belman, A. Kezsbom, 
R. Block. 



56 





DEBATING occupies an important place in 
our extra-curricular program. Competition 
is held on both inter-class and Varsity levels and 
is supervised by the school Debating Manager 
elected each term by the student body. 

Inter-class competition enables interested stu- 
dents to gain valuable experience in public speak- 
ing. Each class team competes in one of two 
leagues — the Junior League for freshmen and 
sophomores and the Senior League for juniors 
and seniors. The school championship is decided 
by a contest between the Junior and Senior 
League winners, held at the end of each term. 



On the Varsity level, our School Debating 
Team competes against other yeshivoth and also 
against leading private schools including Colum- 
bia Grammar and Rhodes High School. The team 
compiled a good record, and was led by Jack 
Neufeld, fall term Debating Manager, and Nathan 
Dershowitz, spring term Debating Manager. 

Other features of the debating program include 
inter-school forums, and assemblies at which 
school debates are featured. A Public Speaking 
Club provides future debaters with needed ex- 
perience. 




w 





Left to right, Top Row: S. Susstnan, D. Jacobson, K. Prager, M. Wolff, H. Yoskowitz, D. Sperl- 
ing, J. Hornblass. Second Row: H. Fischer, W. Reich, L. Waller, H. Tanowitz, M. Wolf. B, Vogel, 

B. Hulkower, J. Werblowsky. Bottom row: M, Kellman, D. Zomick, J. Rappaport, Fall Term 
Debating Manager J. Neufeld, Spring Term Debating Manager T. Dershowitz, E. Lowenstein, 

C. Horowitz, D. Epstein. 




57 




Left to right: L. Dachs, J. Berkowitz, 
D. Rhine, B. Lichtenstein, P. Schneider, 
L. Wachsman. 




Left to right: H. Mezei, I. Haas, Mr. 
Bassell, W. Reich, H. Goodman. 



THE English library has continued to expand 
its facilities this year. With the acquisition of 
many new volumes of both fiction and non- 
fiction, and the reclassification of several sec- 
tions, the library has greatly increased the num- 
ber of books available to the student body. 
Among the new selections are several books on 
mathematics, science and biography, and a com- 
plete reference set on opera and music. The re- 
sponse of the students to these improvements 
has been most gratifying. 

Under the direction of Irwin Haas, Chief 
Librarian, the library staff has been kept busy 
making these new acquisitions available to the 
students. The library's own publication, the 
Library Journal, edited by Irwin Haas and Henry 
Goodman, has also been responsible for the 
upsurge of student interest. Supervising all these 
activities is Mr. Robert Bassell, Faculty Advisor. 



58 



Hebreu, llBRaRy 



SINCE its inception seven years ago, the Hebrew 
Library has become a valuable addition to 
Y.U.H.S.B.'s Talmud and Hebrew departments. 
Its collection totals well over 2500 volumes and 
is constantly being increased. 

The library contains hundreds of commentaries 
on the Bible and Talmud to aid students in their 
morning studies. Recently many new books have 
been purchased covering all phases of Jewish re- 
ligion. Under the direction of Rabbi Epstein, He- 



brew librarian, a cataloging system has been 
worked out. All these factors are responsible for 
the large student patronage which the library 
enjoys. 

An important feature of the Hebrew Library is 
the book agency, headed by Irwin Handel. It 
makes available to the students all types of re- 
ligious articles at greatly reduced prices. Profits 
from these sales go towards the acquisition of 
new books. 




Left to right, Seated: L. Lipnick, Rabbi Epstein, Z. Wein- 
stein. Standing: J. Wolf, I. Handel, J. Frost, B. Vogel. 




59 



ALTHOUGH it is a comparatively recent addi- 
^ tion to Y.U.H.S.B.'s extracurricular program, 
the Yeshiva Organization Commission has already 
established itself as an essential part of school life. 
Under the guidance of Rabbi P. Yogel, the Y.O.C. 
is responsible for the integration of all Y.U.H.S.B.'s 
religious activities. 

Chief among the organizations under Y.O.C. 
jurisdiction are the Minyan, the Mishmar and the 
Kashruth Committee. Our daily prayer group, the 
Minyan, meets daily before classes to fulfill the 
precept of "t'filah b'tzibur", congregational prayer. 
Under the leadership of Harry Mezei and Marcel 
Wachstock, the Minyan has had an average at- 
tendance of thirty students. The Mishmar, headed 
by Irwin Handel, meets every Thursday night. Ap- 
proximately forty-five boys attend this weekly study 
group to augment their morning studies. The Kash- 
ruth Committee, with Eli Shuman as chairman, is 
responsible for checking on the kashruth of all 
foods sold in the school, and reporting the results 
of its investigations to the students. 





Left to right. Standing; I. Handel, E. Shuman. Seated: H. Mezei, M. 
Wachstocl^, Faculty Adviser Rabbi P. Yogel. 



y.o.o. 



Minyon Leaders: H. Mezei and M. Wachstock. 



60 





Left to right: J. Rappaport, M. Sokal, Faculty Adviser Rabbi J. Epstein, 
J. Grossman, N. Kahan. 



ENTERING its tenth year of publication, 
Kolenu, our Hebrew annual, has gradually 
improved with each issue, and today it enjoys 
wide recognition among Jewish scholars and in 
Jewish circles in both America and Israel. Rabbi 
Joseph Epstein, Faculty Adviser to Kolenu, is 
chieflly responsible for Kolenu's outstanding repu- 
tation. 

This year's issue had as its theme the simul- 
taneous occurrence of the tenth anniversary of 
Kolenu and of the State of Israel. In addition to 
articles relating to this theme, Kolenu included 
feature stories on school events and essays on 
various other topics. The latter afford Y.U.H.S.B. 
students their only outlet for creative writing in 
Hebrew. 

Kolenu was edited this year by Joel Grossman 
and Norman Kahan, Editors-in-Chief, and Joseph 
Rappaport and Myron Sokal, Associate Editors. 



Koknu 




61 




VARSITY 



PLAYING under a new coach, Saul Hymo- 
witz, Y.U.H.S.B.'s hoopsters had a disap- 
pointing season. The varsity completed the season 
with a poor 5 and 8 league record, the worst 
record we have had in our short history. 
We won our first three games, beating Flatbush, 
H. I.L.I, and Ramaz by close scores. However, 
following a defeat by Y.U.H.S. and another vic- 
tory over Flatbush, we lost our next five games, 
ending the regular season in a fourth place tie with 
H.I. L.I. In a special playofi: game we defeated 
H.LL.L, 53-49. 

In the regular playofi: game R.J.J, handed us 
one of the worst defeats in our history, beating 
us 72-39. R.J.J, then went on to win the league 
championship by defeating Y.U.H.S. in the finals 
and Ramaz defeated us 52-45 in the consolation 
game. 



Left to tight. Top Row: A. Herman, D. Goldmacher, I. Feigenblum, J. Goldman, R. Mezrich, 
H. Yoskowitz. Middle Row: Manager H. Abromowitz, L. Haspel, J. Hornblass, M. Nathanson, 
N. Berson, Manager S. Hoff, Manager M. Kellman. Bottom Row: P. Berson, T. Dershowitz, 
D. Levine, S. Kramer, H. Fruchter. J. Werblowsky. 




basketball 




In non-league contests, our varsity compiled a 
1 and 5 record, losing four games to Rhodes and 
Brooklyn Friends. The lone non-league victory 
was a 47-40 win over the Alumni. 

High scorers for the season were Sheldon 
Kramer and Daniel Levine with 286 and 192 
points respectively. The high score for a single 
game was 27 points scored by Kramer against 
H.I. L.I. Special thanks should be given to Irv 
Forman who served as assistant coach through- 
out the season. 



Season's Record 

57 Rhodes 

47 Alumni 

48 Flatbush- 

52 H.I.L.I.- 
50 Ramaz* 

46 Y.U.H.S.* 
48 Rhodes 
48 Flatbush' 
41 Y.U.H.S.* 
48 H.I.L.I.'' 

64 Brooklyn Friends 
48 Ramaz* 

47 R.J.J. * 

69 Brooklyn Friends 
54 R.J.J. * 

53 H.I.L.I.** 
39 R.J.J.*- 
45 Ramaz*** 

904 

* League games 
** Playoff games 
*** Consolation game 



Leading Scorers 




86 Kramer 


286 


40 Levine 


192 


39 Fruchter 


146 


48 Goldman 


73 


46 Haspel 


71 


65 Waldman 


59 


70 




36 




72 




61 




78 




50 




58 




75 




65 




49 




72 




52 




1062 




Left to right: Captain S. Kramer. Co- 




Captain D. Levine. 




1 






/^''"^/i- 




■■inms 


J^^ 


^ll^'y 


V^HHik'' 


91. 








Mn^ 


,^*a4K 


^ 1 




^^ 




Lejt to right: J. Rappaport. L. Haspel, M. Nathanson, D. 
Segal, T. Dershowitz. J. Werblowsky. 

OUR tennis team is now in its third year. Last 
season, competing in three matches, it won 
once, tied once, and lost once. This year, however, 
it competed in only one meet. Since all but one of 
the team's six members are returning next year. 
Coach Seymour Hoffman, who has coached the 
team since its inception, feels that prospects for 
next year are very bright. 



Budding 





Left to right: J. Leibowitz, J. Grossman. P. Stein, S. Kramer, Captain N. 
Orenbuch. 

ONE of our chief inter-school activities, the 
chess team this year finished their season with 
a disappointing 1-4 record. Losing to Flatbush, 
Chaim Berhn, M.T.A. and H.LL.L, the chess team 
defeated Flatbush 3'/2-l'/2 for their only victory. 
Our poor showing this year can be attributed main- 
ly to some unfortunate scheduling, meets occurring 
on days when our better players had exams. Com- 
posed of many lower termers, our chess team feels 
confident of a winning record next season. 




PARTICIPATING in only two meets this year, 
the swimming team compiled a mediocre record, 
placing second in one meet and third in the other. 
Hampered by a small schedule, however, the team 
was unable to show its full ability. In existence for 
only two years, the team will definitely improve in 
coming seasons. 



Left to right: C. Nussbaum, S. Sussman, 
Pallant, T. Dershowitz. 




THE track team is one of the oldest of our minor 
Varsity teams. Ably led by Captain Joel 
Schnure, it has successfully dominated the Inter- 
Yeshiva league for the past two years. This year, 
however, the team had a disappointing season, 
placing third in its only meet of the year. Since 
most of its fifteen members are lowertermers, the 
track team's chances for next season are very good. 
With these returning lettermen and an expanded 
schedule the team should once again cop top 
league honors. 



65 




4 



Le]t to right: Captain B. Lichtenstein, Coach M. Sim- 
nowitz. 




THE J.V. plays an important role in Y.U.H.S.B. 
athletics as a training ground for future Varsity 
basketball players. Coached this year by Morris 
Simnowitz, the J.V. compiled a 6-3 record. 

The schedule included games with the Junior 
Varsities of R.J.J, and Flatbush, the only other 
J.V.'s in the Yeshiva League, and with teams from 
local Young Israels and Y.M.H.A.'s. Led in scor- 
ing by Gary Wolff, the J.V.'s six wins included two 
victories over R.J.J, and one victory over Flatbush. 

Coach Simnowitz, a senior, has done a fine job 
with the team, and his graduation will leave the 
J.V. with a hard to fill vacancy. 





hejt to right, Seated: P. Horowitz, G. Kravitz, M. Rubinstein, Captain B. Lichtenstein, G. Szego, 
L. Garber, W. Kerness. Standing: A. Goldstein R. Bleier, D. Levine, K. Prager, M. Wolff, 
S. Solomon, G. Wolff, G Nussbaum, M. Spitzer, Coach M. Simnowitz. 



66 



INTRAMURAL competition is an important 
part of our athletic program. It offers students 
who do not have the natural ability or the time 
to devote to a varsity sport, experience in team 
competition. In this way it serves as a supplement 
to the physical education program. 



INTRAMURAL 




Basketball, softball and slapball tournaments 
comprise the major part of the program, but 
individual competition in ping-pong, handball 
and foul shooting is also held. Both the tourna- 
ments and the individual contests are conducted 
on an elimination basis, and awards are presented 
to the winners in each category at a special 
assembly. 

The entire program is under the direction of 
the School Athletic Manager, assisted by the 
athletic managers of each class. Athletic Man- 
agers this year were Joe Leibowitz, fall term, and 
Larry Haspel, spring term. 




During a brief respite, D. Levine and J. Heimowitz engage in a ping-pong 
match. 



67 



CO-OP 




THE school year, 1957-1958, was an extremely 
successful one for Y.U.H.S.B.'s co-op store. 
Under the co-management of Steve Goldman and 
Donald Goldmacher, the co-op scored both mone- 
tarily and in prestige. A large net profit was 
realized which firmly established the co-op fi- 
nancially, and enabled it to wipe out previous 
debts. Student participation also reached a new 
high, and now, five years after its inception, the 
co-op is a permanent, important and integral 
part of our student program. 



Left to right. Seated: D. Goldmacher, S. Goldman, Managers. 
Standing: M, Wangrofsky, N. Pianko. J. Roth, W. Goldman, L. 
Schechter, C. Adier. 



In Y.U.H.S.B. almost everybody uses the Co-op. 




68 




E 
L 
C 
H 
A 
N 



to 




ncrease man's knowledge. 



T 
E 




LITERATURE 



69 



Shadows of Night 



by STANLEY SUSSMAN 



Shadows of night have enveloped the city. 

Stores are closed, people are sleeping. 

Dogs have stopped barking, 

A II is still, all is calm . . . 

I am sprawled on the sidewalk 

I dream ... 

/ dreamt it was Spring, 

Flowers blossoming. 

The warm fragrance of the sundrenched greenery, 

Birds are warbling, 

Lovers are dreaming. 

People are living for the sake of being alive, 

A nd all is peaceful . . . 

/ dream . . . 

I dreamt suddenly of distortions. 
And then it came to view, 
I was in the midst of hell on earth. 
Freedom of expression, religion . . . none. 
I cried when I witnessed such torment. 
Felt shame for those I loved so. 
Would I fall into the chasm of hell, 
No . . . no . . . 
I dream . . . 

I dreamt I was back in the meadow, 
In a land with evershining sun, 
Back amongst freemen, 
Praying to be one of them, 
I'd share in their lives, 
Their loves, and their hopes. . . . 
A nd all is peaceful . . . 
I dream . . . 

I dreamt that in this land of dreams 
I actually fell in love. 
All that I wished for had come true, 
A nd the world was finally at peace, 
But I awoke . . . 



Epitaph 
for Man 

by BERNARD ROSEN 

A man was born 
Who lived and loved 
And had a wife and child. 
He laughed and cried, 
Put trust in G-d, 
Enjoyed his life and died. 

This epitaph was written 

For all mankind you see. 

For man will live and laugh and cry, 

A nd man will find the time to die 

A nd man can always say with pride, 

"Throughout my life I've simply tried. 



70 



How Great is our Debt 



by BARNET WEINSTOCK 



H 



we are indebted to the Almighty! Had He 
taken us out of Egypt and not wreaked judgments 
upon them, it wduld suffice us. Had He wreaked 
judgments upon them and not upon their gods, it 
would suffice us. Had He brought us into the land of 
Israel and not built for us the Chosen Temple, it 
would suffice us. How much greater then is our in- 
debtedness to the Almighty, for the multiple and 
manifold good He hath bestowed upon us! For He 
took us out of Egypt and wreaked judgments upon 
them . . . and brought us into the land of Israel and 
built for us the Chosen Temple . . ." 

Thus are all the favors which the Almighty did 
for the Children of Israel during the Exodus from 
Egypt enumerated in the well-known Passover 
hymn. How easily might a present-day poet similarly 
describe the events that took place during the first 
ten years of the existence of the State of Israel. 

The proclamation ten years ago, on May 15, 
1948, which established the State of Israel, was met 
with rejoicing by Jews all over the world. This joy, 
however, was tempered by the knowledge that the 
new nation had many great difficulties to overcome. 
The seven Arab states surrounding Israel had de- 
clared their intention of "forcing the Jews back into 
the sea." The hundreds of thousands of refugees 



streaming into Israel has to be provided with homes 
and jobs. The nation's economy had to be built up 
to support the rapidly expanding population. 

During her first ten years, Israel has made tremen- 
dous strides. Immigrants from all over the world, 
from Eastern Europe, from North Africa, and from 
Yemen, have been integrated into Israeli society. 
Thousands of acres of swampland and desert have 
been reclaimed, and converted into rich farmland. 
Industries have been developed. Mines and factories 
have been built. Hospitals and schools have been es- 
tablished. The nation has been put on a sound eco- 
nomic basis. Militarily, Israel has come out on top 
in the two major campaigns against the Arabs. Yes, 
how many are the goodly favors for which we are 
indebted to the Almighty! 

But all is not finished. Israel still remains sur- 
rounded by hostile neighbors. She cannot really de- 
velop until the "cold war" existing in the Middle 
East is brought to an end. And this cannot be ac- 
complished by war, but only through peaceful settle- 
ment. Her first decade has brought Israel economic 
security. May her next decade bring her political 
security. May we be able to say, after ten years. 
"How much greater then is our debt to the Almighty, 
for the multiple and manifold good He has bestowed 
upon us." 



71 



One Summer on a Farm 



b\ STANLEY SUSSMAN 



AS the summer approaches, it brings back fond 
memories of the season I spent in the country 
working on a farm, living close to nature. Ever since 
I was a small child, my family and I spent our sum- 
mers in a small but homey cabin, situated on a lake 
among the pines. This early country environment 
left in me a profound desire to seek out all the ad- 
vantages which the out-of-doors afforded. Summer 
after summer I looked forward to the days of enjoy- 
ment that were in store for me. Then, at long last, 
1 was given the opportunity to work on a farm, close 
to the soil and to the country dwellers themselves. 

The days pass by without incident on a farm; the 
life isn't too exciting entailing as it does a hard grind 
at routine chores. After a while, however, you get 
used to it and are eager to get to work again after 
your day off. It was on one of these days off that I 
decided to take a hike by myself through the coun- 
tryside to look at the scenery. 

Early in the morning, as the rays of sunlight 
pierced through the remaining shadows of dawn 
and enveloped the heavens, I found myself walking 



down a seemingly endless country road. Everything 
around me seemed so different from the city 1 had 
known and been used to all my life. Everything was 
too tranquil and serene. The air had that extra some- 
thing that made it smell so good, the trees were 
taller, and the grass was greener and much more 
lush than anything I had ever gazed upon. It was 
the time of the year when everything was in full 
bloom and the sweet scent of the flowers filled the 
entire countryside. Of special beauty was the fact 
that the leaves were young and not yet scorched by 
the blazing summer sun. I looked and stared for a 
long while at the broad expanse, the rolling hills and 
the rich fields. This is certainly the most beautiful 
gift that G-d has bestowed on the human race. 

Many months later, as I looked back upon my 
summer experience, I thought to myself, "Oh how 
lucky the inhabitants of that area are." Soon after- 
wards I realized how foolish that was. I realized 
that the country has its drawbacks too, and that 
those country folk must often think, "Oh, how nice 
it must be to live in the big city." 



72 




The Dawn of 



the Atomic Age 



by PAUL STEIN 



Hark! it draws near, 

Its glimmering rays gleaming like the sunlight at dawn. 

Nearer it comes and brighter, sharper, clearer. 

Our eyes weak with hurt, yet they continue to stare. 

Oh Lord let us not gaze too intensely lest the light of discovery 

Blind us. 
The dawn of scientific awakening 

Destroy us. 



Fate 




bv PAUL STEIN 



Fate is like a game, 

The wager, one's life and reputation. 
The supreme gamble for fame. 
That offers no consolation. 
In a game one must win or lose 
A nd that is just for fate to choose. 
Fate's other name we know and love 
For it is that of the Lord above. 



73 




b\ IRWIN HAAS 



■ was sitting at my desk preparing a story for the 
morning paper when I got the call. "Fisherman 
reports seeing gigantic monsters heading towards 
New York. Descriptions on eye." Well, I figured, 
it must be one of those guys who just wants to get his 
name in the paper. Funny thing was that I couldn't 
comprehend anyone making up something so fan- 
tastic. Who did that fellow think he was anyway? 
Well, some people will do anything for a spot in the 
news. Then calls started coming from all over. 




"Monsters seen— description on eye." Was the world 
going crazy, I wondered? But what took the cake 
was when a reporter on the staff came in and related 
the crazy story of seeing an eye walking down Fifth 
Avenue in broad daylight. Then I realized this was 
no joking matter. What were the supposed eyes any- 
way? It didn't take long before I found out. Oh yes, 
trouble was brewing. 

Finally an accurate description came in. Yes, it 
was an eye, seven feet tall, having the same charac- 



teristics as the human eye. It moved from place to 
place by masses of protoplasm in the form of legs. 

People were afraid to leave their homes. Was it 
possible? An invasion by eyes! 

Scientists all over the country gathered at a meet- 
ing to discover a way of ridding the world of the 
demons. 

People were disappearing mysteriously and eyes 
were on the increase. It was discovered that the lead- 
ers of the eyes would send kidnappers to different 
homes where it was known that people had 20-20 
vision. The eyes would proceed to eliminate the hu- 
mans by means yet unknown. They would remove 
the eyes from the sockets and bring the eyes up as 
one of their kind. When the eye reached maturity 
(in about two days) it would accompany some of 
the older members on these raids. All healthy-eyed 
individuals were endangered. 

The Army was called. Guns couldn't stop the 
monsters. The Air Force tried dropping bombs on 
them; nothing helped. All branches of the armed 
forces could not seem to rid the world of the 
pestilence. 

One day while standing in my office I blinked for 
lack of adequate light. I had it. What were the eyes 
most sensitive to? Light, of course! that was the an- 
swer to our great problem. Light and more light. 

There was mass production of ffash lights. People 
all over the world were given flash lights to protect 
themselves with. We had covered the eyes. They 
could not stand the light. They were slowly dying 
out. Life was getting back to normal. 

I got a call. Nothing serious. Craziest thing I ever 
heard. Ten thousand pairs of sunglasses were stolen. 




74 



DEVOID OF 
REASON 



by PAUL STEIN 



DURING the party the bayonet on the wall had 
given Ed the chance to tell all of the guests 
of his war experiences and Ed's descriptions of the 
battle had really been the hit of the party. "So you 
really killed the dirty Jap" his boss had commented 
enviously . . . 

There were two men left as the dust cleared. 
The battle was over. Both were weary, both scared, 
both sickened with a mixture of hate and fear. Two 
civilizations were reflected in the eyes of each. 

Ed Wiley, typical American boy after his first 
taste of battle, Isomo Kyoto just a Jap, their minds 
blackened by experiences not meant for human 
eyes. 

The tanks had wiped out what seemed to be all 
players in this small game in the larger game of 
war. Planes reared from above shooting at any- 
thing that moved. 

The Jap was mortally wounded. He was a 
veteran and already had smelt the blood of battle, 
but now it was his own. He had been indoctrinated 
against moments like this. "Feel no emotion." said 
the Commander. "Men must die in battle for such 
is war." He had listened, he had nodded his head, 
he had shouted, "Hail the emperor," he had almost 
convinced himself on the validity of the argument. 
His brothers had fallen in battle, he was a hero. 
Yet as the dust cleared he felt remorse. He was a 



traitor to the ideals for which he was fighting but 
felt no pangs of guilt. 

The American on the other side remembered 
little about the battle. This was his first taste of 
combat. A "fighting leatherneck" but already the 
leather had melted from the drowning of his will 
in the blood of his buddies. Now he faced the clear- 
ing dust of battle. 

Both men were wounded. The Jap was dying, 
that was obvious. Obviously he would not survive. 
The thought of life after death did not prey on his 
consciousness. Somehow he lifted himself painfully 
and grabbed his rifle by habit. He had experience 
of many ordeals of the hand to hand combat. The 
American was unaware of the stealthy Jap ap- 
proaching him. Abruptly the Jap drew to a halt. 




Suddenly both men faced each other. The Jap 
threw down his rifle. He knew he could not pos- 
sibly survive. He could not feel revenge, he had 
decided to give life instead of taking one more to 
his grave. 

Ed saw the gesture. He saw a man dying in 
front of him. His mind became devoid of reason. 
With a shout he grabbed his rifle and fired once 
and again . . . until the head of Kyoto was twisted 
and severed from its moorings. "I killed him, I 
killed the dirty Jap," was the only thought left in 
his dulled brain. 



75 



He Lived Bif 




the Book 



by PAUL STEIN 



He came one day strong and great. 
When I had had my share 
Lusting for my portion by fate. 
He took that, and left despair. 



My home I sold 
My funds were thin, 
My life too old 
Too again begin. 

Gone now all that I own 
Years and disease take their toll. 
Wife and son cold and alone. 
Perished with purity of soul. 

I managed to survive, 
Not live, but just exist. 
Drunk and cold, merely alive 
While he with fame was kissed. 

"He lived by the book, and died by the book, 
A life long and proud." 
My heart stood still, my body shook, 
"What book?" I wondered out loud. 



Without Hope 



by WALTER REICH 



When conquerors eyes are gleaming 
Like a noviac star, 
The sunrise sets for the vanquished 
The men run for their caves 
When hope is vanquished 



Let me be no nearer 

To death's pseudo-kingdom. 

Let me see no closer 

The black ensign-bearing reptile 

Of the old forsaken worship 

Of a thousand years of knowledge 

And a thousand years of strife 

And a million years of living in a mock world 

A nd to hope no longer 

Start the clock and set it 
Make it go backwards 
Set it also forwards 
For time does not matter 
When hope is gone and buried 
To hope is to love 

Courses never meet 

In a parallel beginning .... 

Walking alone 

All alone 

A stranger sees you coming; 

The days grow short and dark; 

The hours lie stagnant — 

Afraid to move .... 

In a world without hope 

We see ourselves together 

On the planet of lost reality 

Of the patient, willowing mother 

Lost in the intricate sewing; 

In the geometric patterns 

Of a superficial entity. 

Hope is superficial 



Those who have seen it ... . 

The forsaken wisdom; 

The dark and brooding fortress 

With violent thoughts returning 

Of a lost beginning 

In a lost idea 

Raptures do not herald 

The light of coming dimensions. 

The infinite thought recedes . . . 

It responds to the spasm. 

The spasm is lost. 

Lost. 

But yet we trust 

Pomp has its splendour . . . 

Grandiose carpets bedecked 

With awsome knights in battle 

In an aged world of cooling fragments 

Of a kingdom lost and buried 

While thought is not apart 

Invincible and fathomless . . . 
The marks of a forgotten lore 
Of the aged lust for life 
And the hope for a good tomorrow 
Tomorrow is forever 



••■•'^ 












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M* 



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i::/i-M-ji 






77 




THE/lANSWER 



OF course it was sheer torture for an eight year 
old youngster with a complete knowledge of 
calculus to sit through a morning of "four plus 
four equals eight." Mr. Mathers, the obese prin- 
cipal, dotingly erupted at every opportunity, "That 
there Jimmy Owens is smarter than some of those 
crackpot teachers I got." That was not saying 
much for the teachers, but Mr. Mathers never 
intended to. 

Jimmy was a "regular guy," well liked by both 
his classmates and his teachers. His happy days 
were frequently marred, however, by such ques- 
tions as, "Hey Jimmy, did your father really die 
in the war?", which were often addressed to him 
by strangers. His mother's answers to his constant 
questions were not very helpful. "Oh, he was a 
good man, Jimmy. He, er, just died, that's all. 

Nothing special. Let's talk about something 

else, huh?" 

Jimmy sensed that something was wrong in the 
way she talked and the way she looked at him. 
Throughout his high school and college careers he 
carried this heavy burden in his heart. 




by HERBERT TANOWITZ 



He graduated from high school at the top of his 
class. In college he had a "straight A" average and 
was captain of the football team and president of 
his fraternity. In 1953 he completed his studies at 
Harvard Law School and began to practice law in 
Lowell, Massachusetts. 

In 1955, a new era began in television — the 
rise of the "Big Give-Away" program. There was 
a great clamor throughout the country as people 
sat by their television sets and marvelled at the 
amount of money being won by quiz show con- 
testants. Jim and his friends were no exception. In 
fact it was on such an evening that Jack Baker 
suggested that Jim try to get on a quiz program. 
At first Jim hesitated, but finally Jack convinced 
him. The very next morning he wrote a letter to 
"Know It All" asking for a chance to appear on 
the program. Two months later he was asked to 
appear on the night of September 6th. 



78 



On the very first night Jim won $10,000 and on 
the second show he ran his winnings up to $35,- 
000. He answered questions on every conceivable 
topic. After every show he promised himself that 
he would quit, but on stage, week after week, he 
decided to continue. By December 15th he had 
won $70,000. A correct answer this evening would 
give him $101,500. The category was "Traitors 
and Spies." Jim began by answering correctly iden- 
tifying Benedict Arnold and Aaron Burr. 

"And now, Mr. Owens," shouted the announcer, 
anticipating another victory, "for $101,500, name 
the spy who, during World War I, worked in Paris 
under Hans Copurt." Immediately Jim answered, 
"Robert Krupt." 

"I beg your pardon, Mr. Owens, What was that 
answer?" 

"Robert Krupt" said Jim with confidence in his 
voice. 

"I'll have to ask for a ruling on that," said the 
M.C. "Oh Fm terribly sorry, Mr. Owens. Your 
answer is incorrect. The correct answer is Robert 
Owens, a most remarkable coincidence." 

"But that's impossible, that answer you gave," 
said Jim with a tremor in his voice. 

"Robert Owens?" repeated the M.C. 



"Yes. That's impossible," repeated Jim, his 
heart pounded rapidly and sweat trickling down 
his face. "That was my father." 

Silence prevailed throughout the studio, and a 
dark cloud hung over the stage. In Mobile, Ala- 
bama, the home of Robert Krupt, some people say 
that at that fateful moment they heard a roaring 
laughter that broke the stillness of the night, com- 
ing from the grave of Robert Krupt. 




79 




J c: J 



A fond Farewell 



by JOEL GROSSMAN 



FOUR years have passed since we first entered 
high school. During this period we have changed 
radically in all facets of our personalities. In effect, 
we, the graduates who are now leaving high school 
and entering college are not the same people who 
enrolled here four years ago. We have learned much 
during our high school careers. We have broadened 
our horizons, increased our knowledge, and ma- 
tured in numerous other ways. When we first came 
here we were immature, just beginning to grow up. 
Today we are but a step away from full adulthood. 
During our stay the faculty and administration have 
worked long and hard to help us become better 
citizens, sober and intelligent adults, and observ- 
ant Jews. 

Now, as graduates, each going to a college of his 
choosing and embarking on a career of his own, we 
perhaps do not realize the true worth of the educa- 
tion obtained during the past four years. Being so 
close to the school we are inclined to become overly 
cynical and overemphasize its faults and deprecate 
its accomplishments. True, our school is far from 



perfect, but no institution can ever hope to achieve 
perfection. And equally true, we have been faced 
with hardships and obstacles; but so it goes through- 
out life. The school, perhaps somewhat deservingly, 
has been the butt of many students quips and jokes. 
Yet the previous not withstanding, we do not fully 
appreciate the school which has played such an in- 
tegral part in molding us and thus, indirectly, will 
continue to play an important part in our lives" in 
the years to come. 

Attitudes comparable to ours are found con- 
stantly in everyday life. Did the people in "the good 
old days" ever dream that they were living in an 
era which would be called by that name? Why if 
they had heard about all our appliances and con- 
veniences they would have thought that we were 
living in a veritable Utopia. Yet people still remi- 
nisce about and even yearn for the so-called "good 
old days." So, too, with our school. In the years to 
come we shall most certainly look upon our careers 
at B.T.A., if not with zealous adoration, then at 
least with a certain degree of fondness. 





E 
L 

C 
H 
A 
N 
I 




raverse the jar reaches of the universe. 



mmmmm 



Compliments of . . . 


Compliments of . . . 




FIRST CONGREGATION ANSHE SFARD 


Congregation AHAVATH 


ACHIM 


14th Avenue cor. 45th Street 


203 East 37th Street 




Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Brooklyn, New York 




Compliments of . . . 






YOUNG ISRAEL 


Compliments of . . . 




OF 


CONGREGATION SHOMREI 


EMUNAH 


BORO PARK 






Dr. Samuel K. Mirsky, Rabbi 


5202 — 14th Avenue 




Gilbert DavidofF, President 


Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 





THE GENERAL ORGANIZATION OF 
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL OF BROOKLYN 

Congratulates 
THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1958 



OFFICERS, FALL TERM 

Martin Strobel, President 

Henry Belman, V/ce-Pres/cfent 

David Lazar, Secretary Treasurer 



OFFICERS, SPRING TERM 

Henry Belman, President 

Nechemia Reiss, V/ce-President 

David Lazar, Secretary Treasurer 



Mr. Joseph B. Strum, Faculty Advisor 





Congratulations to . . . 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1958 

from 

THE PARENTS ASSOCIATION 

Mrs. A. B. Schnure, Presidenf Mrs. Herman Meshenberg, Financial Secretary 

Mrs. David Flamholz, Vice-President Mrs. Ruben Cohen, Recording Secretary 

Mrs. Abraham Bursky, Treasurer 



THE ARISTA SOCIETY OF 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL OF BROOKLYN 

Congratulates 

THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1958 



OFFICERS, FALL TERM 
Leader, Paul Stein 
Vice-Leader, Murray Mednick 
Secrefory, Noel Nusbacher 



OFFICERS, SPRING TERM 
Leader, Joel Grossman 
Vice-Leader, Charles Cantor 
Secrefory, Bennett Palla 



Faculty Advisor, Mr. Samuel H. Lebowitz 





83 



Congratulations to 



ARTHUR BERMAN 



from 



Mom and Dad 
David 

Howard 
Arlene 

MODERN TOURS INC. 
500 — Fifth Avenue 
New York 36, New York 




Congratulations to . . . 

WARREN ENKER 

Upon His Graduation 

from 

Mother and Arnold 

Mr. and Mrs. Mendel Schapira, Grandparents 
Aunt Hattie 

Aunt Anne and Uncle Arthur 
Elayne 

Aunt Ella and Uncle ZaI 
Aunt Cele and Uncle Irv 
Joanie 

Cousins Harry and Sara Silver 
Mr. and Mrs. Irving S. Horowitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Max Rosenberg 





Congratulations to 



DANIEL LEVINE 



from 



Grandparents 

Rabbi Zaiman Shapiro 

Rabbi and Mrs. Lipman Levine 

Mom and Dad 

Aunt Lil and Uncle Irving and Family 

Aunt Rose and Uncle LaibI and Family 

Aunt Sara and Uncle Abe and Family 

Aunt Ethel and Uncle Jesse and Family 



Aunt Annie and Uncle Joe and Family 
Aunt Lil and Uncle Herman and Family 
Aunt Rachel and Uncle Sol and Family 
Aunt Ann and Uncle Jack and Family 
Aunt Lena and Uncle Sidney and Family 
Aunt Etta and Uncle David and Family 
Aunt Sarah and Uncle Joseph and Family 
Aunt Rose and Uncle Abe and Family 



And from all the Cousins 




Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

BENNETT SAMUEL JAY PALLANT 

from 

Uncle Sam and Aunt Helen Fingerhut 

Beverly, Janey, and Andrew Forray 

Arthur, Florence, Toni, and Eric Fingerhut 





Y.U.H.S.B.B B B 

Xa.7o CHURCH Ave 



1^ />!«'/' \' 




J 119 



87 




Congratulations to 



JOEL J. SCHNURE 

from 

Mom, Dad, and Andy 
Grandpa Epstein 

Uncle Sidney and Aunt Sadie 

Uncle Jesse, Aunt Libby, David and Laura 
Uncle Harold and Aunt Mary 




Congratulations and Best Wishes to 



DAVID SEGAL 



from 



Mom and Dad 

Beverly and Martin 
Toby and Jack 

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Lesser 
Mr. and Mrs. Judah Falik 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Dinitz 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

SAMUEL SHIFF 

from 

Mom and Dad 

Ruthy, Teddy and Kids 
Elsie and Kids 

Aunt Betty, Uncle Abram and Kids 
Uncle Harry and Rhoda 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Feldman and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Max Gordon 
Parisian Caterers 

B'nai Israel of Linden Heights 
Levine Brothers 
Jacob Blazer 




Congratulations to 



STEVEN STEIN 



from 



Grandma, Mom, and Dad 
Toby and Sheldon 

Uncle Nathan, Aunt Sylvia, and Sheldon 
Uncle Morris and Phyliss 
Lester, Ronnie, and Eric 
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Wigdor 
Barbara, and Penny 
Miss Arlene Justiz 
The Topics 





Congratulation to . . . 



MURRAY MEDNICK 



from 



Mom,Baba, Aunts, Uncles, Cousins and Friends 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Shmukler 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerson Lerner 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Hardy 
Mr. and Mrs. M. EdI 

Rose, Celia, and Johnny 
Dr. H. L. Rosofsky 

JifFy Auto Laundry 



Marvin Lieberman, C.P.A. 
Eleven Broadway 
New York 4, N. Y. 
WHitehall 3-1388 



Meyer C. Molinsky, M.D. 

417 Pennsylvania Avenue 

Brooklyn 7, N. Y. 

Dickens 2-0161 



M. Fortunoff— Gifts 

561 Livonia Avenue 

Brooklyn 7, N. Y. 




Congratulations to . . . 

HENRY BELMAN 

from 

Mom, Dad, and Sheila 
Ralph Iron Works 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Berkowitz and Family 
Metallic Novelty Yarns Inc. 

Jewish Community Center of Alden Terrace 



Congratulations to 



NATHAN ORENBUCH 



from 



Mom and Dad 

Sara, Aaron and Libby Toby 

Aunt Freida and Uncle Jack 




93 



Congratulations to . . . 

BENNETT S. J. PALLANT 

from 



Dr. F. A.SEIDEN 
1917 Bedford Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



MOM, DAD, and CAROL 

KANNER LEATHER GOODS CORP. 
65 Hope Street 
Brooklyn 1 1 , New York 

PARDES AND GOODMAN 
252 West 30th Street 
New York, New York 





REGULARLY SCHEDULED SAILINGS EVERY 3 WEEKS 

Aboard the beautijid new ZIM liners 

S.S.ISRAELS.S.ZION 

A memorable trip, in the atmosphere of Israel itself I 
Perfect winter vacation — and a perfect way to get 
there . . . relaxed, refreshed, in easy-going comfort 
all the way! 

For stopovers in Europe . . . side trips to Israel 
$.S. JERUSALEM • S.S.THEODOR HERZL 

Newest, fastest passenger liners serving 
MARSEILLES • GENOA • NAPLES • VENICE • PIRAEUS • HAIFA 




c'^w. 



^^ .• 



ZIM LINERS ARRIVE 

AND DEPART FROM 

ISRAEL EVERY WEEK 

OF THE YEAR 



42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 4, N. Y. 



DIGBY 4-7600 



With the Compliments of . . . 



EL HI 




I5IIIIEL niRUNES 




With the Compliments of 



m 



«o€an TOURS 

500 Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C. 10 5-3770 
27 Canal Street, N. Y. C. GR 5-6779 





95 




Congratulations to . . 



JOEL J. SCHNURE 

from 

MIKE LEVINE CO. 
1385 Broadway 
New York, New York 



Congratulations to 



JACOB PARNESS 



from 



Mom, Dad, and Beverly 

Sheldon and Judy Schwartz 

Ben Lefkowitz 

Advanced Electronics 

Elegante 

Deutsch's 

Mr. and Mrs. Pressman 



Grandma and Grandpa 
Zv/ails Fish Market 
Ambassador Pharmacy 
Reliable Thread Co. 
Semel and Sons 
Boro Fuel Co. 
Uncle Dave 




96 



Congratulations to . . 



NECHEMIA REISS 



from 



Mom and Dad 



Moshe 



Leibel 



Isaac 



Congratulations to 



STEVEN GOLDMAN 



from 



Mom, Dad, Bubba, Warren and Debbie 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Lane 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Schwartz 

Edward G. Koeppel, D.D.S. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Srulowitz 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Schoen 




Compliments of . . . 



ROYAL FARMS 



Better Dairy Stores 

all over Brooklyn and 

Long Island 



Congratulations to . . . 



LARRY PADWA 



from 



FAMILY AND FRIENDS 




Congratulations to . . . 



SHELDON KRAMER 



from 



Mom and Dad 



Annette and Joe 

Herb and Erma 



Aunt Minnie and Uncle Arthur 



Congratulations to 



MARTIN SERVICE, 
CUSTOM CLEANING 
769 New Lots Ave. 
Brooklyn 8, New York 



ROBERT APSEL 



from 



Mom, Dad, David and Helen 

BEN-ART AUTO SALES, INC. 
5709 Church Avenue 
Brooklyn 3, New York 



LAURANCE PHARMACY 
740 New Lots Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



SIDNEY MINKOFF D.D.S. RALPH ROSOFSKY, INSURANCE SOL AXELROD D.D.S 

2530 Pitkin Avenue 1 374 Flatbush Avenue 2530 Pitkin Avenue 

Brooklyn 8, New York Brooklyn 1 0, New York Brooklyn 8, New York 





itf.eta^K. 



99 



Congratulations to . 



JERRY SUSSMAN 



from 



Joe Shorer and Family 



Congratu/at/ons to . . . 

STANLEY KAPLAN 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kaplan 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Goldstein 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Kaplan 



SHELDON SCHECHTER 



Mom, Dad and Ronnie 

Mr. and Mrs. Speiser 

Mr. and Mrs. Feld 

Mr. and Mrs. Steiger 




Congratu/ot/ons to . 



BARNET WEINSTOCK 

from 

Mom, Dad, and William 
Grandma Rose 
Grandpa Borris 



Congratulations to . . . 



100 



TO ARI COHEN . . . 

Travel to successful destination 

BROADWAY TRAVEL 
AND RESORT SERVICE 

1650 Broadway PLaza 7-8690 

Reservations for all Airlines, resorts and cruises 

cheerfully made and carefully planned at 

no extra charge. 



ABE COHEN 



ABRAHAM PLOTZKER 



Congratulafions to . . . 

IRWIN HAAS 

from 

Mom and Dad 

Arnold 

Rita 

Mrs Friedman 
Friends 



Congratu/ations ond Best Wishes to . . . 

THE GRADUATING CLASS 
OF 1958 

from 

KENMORE BOWLING ALLEYS 

2228 Church Avenue 

Brooklyn 26, Nev/ York 

INgersol 2-9734 



Congratulafions and Best Wislies to . . . 



JEROME HORNBLASS 

from 

Mom and Dad 

Grandma 

Sisters Rozzy and Arlene 

Brother-in-laws Milton and Sol 

Brother Albert and Family 




101 



Congratulafions fo . . . 



JULES PUGACH 



from 



Mom and Dad 



Noel 



Congrafulaiions fo . 



PAUL STEIN 

from 

Mom, Dad, and Michael 

Roberta 

Grandmother and Grandfather 

Aunt Esther 



Congratulafions to . 



GERALD ROTH 

from 

Mom and Dad 
Sheldon 
Roberta 



Congratulations to , 



STEVEN ZAVELOFF 

from 

Grandma 

Uncle Abe 

Aunt Jennie 

Harry Matsil and Sons 




Compliments of . 



GHANA PHILATELIC AGENCY LTD. 



91 Wall Street 



New York, New York 



Mazel Toy to . . . 

MORRIS JOSEPH 

from 

Mrs. Fagel SImnowitz 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Wernick 

Jessica, Benjamin, Nechemia and Basheva 



Compliments of . . . 




B. DIAMOND and SON 

Leather and Plastic Goods 

85 Varet Street 
Brooklyn, New York 



Comp/iments of . . . 

COMMERCIAL STATE BANK 
and Trust Company of New York 

formerly 

MODERN INDUSTRIAL BANK 

Nine offices Conveniently Located in 

MANHATTAN, BRONX, BROOKLYN and QUEENS 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Company 




Congrotu/ot/ons to . . . 

HARRY MEZEI 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Levine 

Aunt Rose 

Robert 



Best Wishes to . 



NOEL NUSBACHER 

from 

Aunt Tavie and Uncle Bill 

and all the Girls 




Y.U.H.S.B.B B B 

Xa,70 CMORCH Ave 



rfHu»/n' 




103 




\ 



Best Wishes to our son 

DAVID 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Jacobs 

Congratulations to . . . 

PHIL 

from 

Mom, Dad, and Carol 




Congratu/otionj to . . . 

ABE ROSENBERG 

from 

Mom and Dad 



Compliments of . 



BARTONJ^Z^ 



FAMOUS FOR CONTINENTAL 
CHOCOLATES 




Compliments of . . . 

BRAVERMAN'S SLEEP-O-RAMA 

SPECIALISTS IN ALL TYPES OF BEDDING 



601 Ridge Rd. 
No. Arlington 



770 West Side Ave. 
Jersey City 



Congratulations and Best Wishes to . . . 

STEVEN ZAVELOFF 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Matsil 



Best Wishes to . . . 

STANLEY SUSSMAN 

and The Graduates of 1958 

from 

The Good Health Seltzer Drivers Union 




104 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARCEL WACHSTOCK 

from 

his Uncle Leon Weinman 

Good Luck to . . . 

STANLEY SUSSMAN 

from 

Leo Sussman 

Best Wishes to . . . 

ARI COHEN 

from 
American Examiner Inc. 

NEW YORK'S ONLY 
Anglo Jewish Weekly Newspaper 

Congrofu/af/ons fo . . . 



ARI COHEN 

from 

The Pinochle Club 

Jack Cohen 
Henry Stein 
Herman Wolicki 



Congrofo/ot/ons fo . . . 

JACK SIEGAL 

from 

Uncle Joe 

Our Bejf Wishes to Our Son 

STANLEY SUSSMAN 

and his classmates, and may they 
all have much success in Life. 

Mother, Dad, Grandma, and Sandra 



Good Luck to . . 



ARI COHEN 



INTERIORS BY FURST 

"Professional Decorating and Design" 
Wholesale Retail 

Fallsburg, New York 

Fallsburg 60 
(formerly Hotel Furst) 



Congratulations to . . . 

DAVID GOLD 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Slipowitz 

974-46th Street 

Brooklyn, New York 

Elefant and Wachtenheim Inc. 

363-7th Avenue 
New York, New York 




Congratulations to . . . 



MARTIN STROBEL 



UPON HIS GRADUATION 



from 



MOM AND DAD 



ALBERT AND ROCHELLE 



Congrafuhtions to . . . 

DAVID ROSENMAN 

from 

Abraham Philips & Sons, Inc. 

44 East Broadway 
New York 2, New York 

MANUFACTURERS OF TOWN TOP CLOTHES 



Congratuhfions and Best Wishes fo . . . 

STEVEN ZAVELOFF 

from 

Mom, Dad, and Marvin 



Congrafulafions fo . . . 

MOISHE WEINSTEIN 

May your Graduafion serve as a stepping 
stone for a bright and successful future. 

Mr. and Mrs. Anshel Weinstein 



and Esther 



TO A FINE NEPHEW 



PAUL STEIN 



Uncle Harry 



Compliments of . . . 

HARRY FENSTERHEIM 

520 East 20th Street 
New York 9, New York 




Compliments of . . . 

ILLFELDER IMPORTING CO., INC. 

Toys and Novelties 
131-133 East 23rd Street 
New York 1 0, New York 

Established 1884 BU 2-2703 

DRAKE BUSINESS SCHOOLS, INC. 

Ait Commercial Subjects Day & Evening Sessions 

OPEN ALL SUMMER 
885 Flatbush Avenue Brooklyn 26, New York 

Compliments of . . . 

EMPIRE 
CORRUGATED CONTAINER CORP. 

N. Y. International Airport 
Jamaica 30, New York 

Compliments of . . . 

MUTUAL VALET STORES INC. 

The Finest Cleaning at the Lowest Price 

Plant and Plant store 

1 109 Sutter Avenue 

Brooklyn 8, New York 

APplegate 7-4730 




Compliments of . . . 

MERMELSTEIN CATERERS 

APPOINTED EXCLUSIVE CATERERS FOR 

YOUNG ISRAEL OF EASTERN PARKWAY 

OPEN FOR FALL BOOKINGS 

351 Kingston Avenue 

Brooklyn, New York 



Compliments of . . . 

REDIKER AIR CARGO, INC. 

281 Church Avenue 
New York City 



Comp/Zments of . . 



THE CHALFIN FOUNDATION 

318 West 39th Street 
New York 18, New York 



Comp/iments of . . . 

BRAND MANUFACTURING CORP 

795-803 Lexington Avenue 
Brooklyn 21, New York 




»».eH«>£K' 



107 



In Loving Memory of 



HARRY ENKER n">j 



by 



MRS. MINA ENKER 



and 



Children 



ARNOLD - WARREN 



In Loving Memory of . . . 

SAM MOSKOWITZ n u 
by 
His Wife, Children and Grandchildren 


In Loving Memory of . . . 

MAX KAMIN n"v 
by 
The Kamin Family 


In Loving Memory of . . . 

MARY WEISSMAN p'v 


In Loving Memory of . . . 

ESTHER WISHNER n'j? 



108 



DONORS AND PATRONS 



SANITARY LAUNDRY 

21 18-20 Rockaway Ave. 
Brooklyn, New York 

SCHWARTZ'S SUPERIORS YEAST INC. 

566 East 94th Street 
Brooklyn, New York 

MR.andMRS.A. HOLLINS 

716 Ave "J" 

Brooklyn 30, New Yor k 

SPARTAN TEXTILE CO. 

70 Eldridge Street 
New York City 

CEALE'S CLEANERS 

1 309-49th Street 
Brooklyn 19, New York 

MR. and MRS. H. MESHENBERG 

1 569-50th Street 
Brooklyn 19, New York 

PHILIP DUKOFF MEAT MARKET 

5209-1 3th Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

CHARLEY'S FRUIT STORE 

5209- 13th Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

HOROWITZ BROS., SMOKED FISH 

677-681 Von Sindren Avenue 
Brooklyn 7, New York 

MR. MOSES KRUMBEIN 

1425-51st Street 
Brooklyn 1 9, New York 

M. M. UNDERWEAR CO. 

55 Orchard Street 
New York City 

TRIO ORX GOODS CORP. 

53 East Broadway 
New York, New York 

TRIO SLIP COVER & DRAPERY CO. 

62 East Broadway 
New York, New York 

WEISS and SCHWARTZ 

47 East Broadway 
New York, New York 



ROSENTHAL & ZWIEG 

842 Franklin Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



Kosher Meats 



KRENNEN 

50 Orchard Street 
New York, New York 

ATMOR STORE FIXTURE CO., INC. 

1 07 Bowery 

New York 2, New York 

MIKE SCHECHTER INC. 

1474 Ralph Avenue 
Brooklyn 36, New York 

ASHENBURG 

75 Columbia Street 
New York, New York 

ERASMUS LUNCHEONETTE 

2287 Church Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

WOMENS CLUB OF ANSHEI ZEDEK 

308 Atkins Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

CANTOR ISRAEL WEINSTEIN 

255 East 95th Street 
Brooklyn 1 2, New York 

IRVINGS SHOES 

1099 Rutland Road 
Brooklyn 12, New York 

Congratulations to . . . 
MOISHE WEINSTEIN 

from 

Mr. and Mrs. Eisenstein 

EMPIRE DRUG SHOP 

Empire Boulevard and Brooklyn Ave. 
Brooklyn, New York 

GOOD WILL SERVICE STATION 

509 Remsen Avenue 
Brooklyn 1 2, New York 

TREASURE VENDING CO. 

Coffee, Soda and Candy 

ABIE'S MEAT AND POULTRY MK'T. 

541 Ralph Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

GREENFELD'S BAKERY 

2205 Avenue X 
Brooklyn, New York 

SOL'S & LEE'S FOOD & FRUIT MART 

4217-19 Church Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 





DONORS AND PATRONS 




CHURCH FABRICS 

2270 Church Avenue 
Brooklyn 26, New York 

BRAVER BROTHERS 

2248 Church Avenue 
Brooklyn 26, Nev/ York 

CELIA STERN, D.D.S. 

5501 -15th Avenue 
Brooklyn 19, New York 

EMMET PACKING CO., INC. 

257 Schenectady Avenue 
Brooklyn 1 3, New York 

ROSENBERG'S MEAT MARKET 

54 1 7 New Utrecht Avenue 
Brooklyn 19, New York 

MARTIN LICHTENSTEIN 

74 Arlington Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

ISRAEL HEATING CO. 

121 Jamaica Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

LEFKOWITZ BROTHERS 

4620-1 8th Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

JOSEPH SCHNECK 

4702- 18th Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

MISLER FOOD STORES 

821 Avenue H 
Brooklyn 30, New York 

STRAUSS CLEANER INC. 

815 Avenue H 
Brooklyn 30, New York 

A. KALM CO., INC. 

41-43 West 45th Street 
New York, New York 

MR.andMRS.J.QUENZEL 

47-49 Riverdale Avenue 
Brooklyn 1 2, New York 

B & H DAIRY AND 
MATAMIM KOSHER BUTCHERS 

Brownsville 

MR. and MRS. I. GROSSMAN 

1037-5 1st Street 
Brooklyn 19, New York 



F. L. NAGEL'S PHARMACY 

Corner Lee Ave. and Hooper St. 
Brooklyn 1 1, New York 

COHEN and LEVINE KOSHER MEAT MK'T. 

4004-1 3th Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

J. NARBY 

Manufacturer of Pedi Brand Dog 
Furnishings and Leather Specialties 

CHARLES WILDER 

2963 Fulton Street 
Brooklyn, New York 

EPHRAIM STERN 

48 1 8 Church Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

SAM SIEGAL 

200 Kosciusco Street 
Brooklyn, New York 

MR. and MRS. WEINTRAUB 

8862-19th Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

DR, I. GOLDSTEIN 

666 Linden Boulevard 
Brooklyn, New York 

ARTHUR ROSENBERG INSURANCE 

7309-3rd Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

MR. and MRS. PHILIP ROSENFELD 

2236 Merokee Place 
Billmore L. I., New York 

DR. A. MANDELBAUM 

1931 Bedford Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

PHILIP and SAMUEL FADER 

83 A Livonia Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

QUALITY DELICATESSEN & RESTAURANT 

1 904 Church Avenue 
Brooklyn 26, New York 

HOFFMAN and BRANDEIS 

3033 Coney Island Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 

PURETZ and GREENBAUM 

1 92 Division Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



LEON POLLACK 

200 West 146th Street 
New York 30, New York 



SENIOR 



RECTORY 




ROBERT APSEL, 698 Ashford Street 

HENRY BELMAN, 1292 Barry Drive, Valley Stream 

ARTHUR BERMAN, 1425-51 Street 

SOLOMON BOCKSTEIN, 802 Saratoga Avenue 

PHILIP BRUMER, 840 East 8 Street 

ARI COHEN, 2118 Strauss Street 

WARREN ENKER, 586 Montgomery Street 

DONALD FRIEDLANDER, 2455 East 22 Street 

PHILIP FROST, 2256 East 26 Street 

DAVID GOLD, 1423 - 46 Street 

STEVEN GOLDMAN, 215-51 Merdock Avenue, Queens Village 

HENRY GOODMAN, 1769 -49 Street 

JOEL GROSSMAN, 1037-51 Street 

IRWIN HAAS, 1857 - 50 Street 

IRWIN HANDEL, 1496 St. Marks Avenue 

JEROME HORNBLASS, 4600 Ninth Avenue 

DAVID JACOBS, 342 Montauk Avenue 

NORMAN KAHAN, 2939 Ocean Avenue 

STANLEY KAPLAN, 190 Ross Street 

IAN KELLMAN, 1543 Caroll Street 

ALLAN KEZSBOM, 305 East 34 Street 

SHELDON KRAMER, 934 Ralph Avenue 

DANIEL LEVINE, 144-32 - 70 Avenue, Kew Garden Hills 

MURRAY MEDNICK, 550 Georgia Avenue 

HARRY MEZEI, 1552-41 Street 

JACK NEUFELD, 220 Bay 22 Street 

NOEL NUSSBACHER, 145 Hooper Street 

NATHANIEL ORENBUCH, 307 Williams Avenue 

LARRY PADWA, 7 1 8 New Jersey Avenue 

BENNETT PALLANT, 555 Bedford Avenue 

JACOB PARNESS, 1525 -50 Street 

JULES PUGACH, 175 Ocean Parkway 

NECHEMIAH REISS, 637 Montgomery Street 

BERNARD ROSEN, 1239 St. Johns Place 

ABRAHAM ROSENBERG, 65-60 Witherole Street, Queens 

DAVID ROSENMAN, 1 34 East 94 Street 

GERALD ROTH, 189 East 96 Street 

SIMON RUBIN, 1288 St. Johns Place 

SHELDON SCHECHTER, 875 Driggs Avenue 

ARNOLD SCHLEIFER, 926 - 47 Street 

JOEL J. SCHNURE, 1477 East 32 Street 

DAVID SEGAL, 616 Empire Boulevard 

ABRAHAM SHIFF, 859 - 42 Street 

ELI SHUMAN, 1571 Sterling Place 

JACOB SIEGEL, 574 Greene Avenue 

DANIEL SIEGFRIED, 133 East 43 Street 

MORRIS SIMNOWITZ, 513 East 51 Street 

PHILIP SINGER, 1610 Bedford Avenue 

PAUL STEIN, 202 East 95 Street 

STEVEN STEIN, 380 Linden Boulevard 

MAURICE STRAHLBERG, 1609 -54 Street 

MARTIN STROBEL, 480 Amboy Street 

JEROLD SUSSMAN, 528 Shepard Avenue 

STANLEY SUSSMAN, 5501 - 14 Avenue 

MARCEL WACHSTOCK, 133 Lefferts Avenue 

MORRIS WEINSTEIN, 226 East 96 Street 

BARNET WEINSTOCK, 1257 - 44 Street 

STEVEN ZAVELOFF, 5524 - 13 Avenue 





HI 




E 
L 

C 
H 
A 
N 
I 
T 



to 




xtend the boundaries of mans domain. 



PHOTOS BY LORSTAN STUDIOS 



mm m's^ 




v:-./^* 



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